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Title: Implementation of the Immersed Boundary Method in the Weather Research and Forecasting model

Abstract

Accurate simulations of atmospheric boundary layer flow are vital for predicting dispersion of contaminant releases, particularly in densely populated urban regions where first responders must react within minutes and the consequences of forecast errors are potentially disastrous. Current mesoscale models do not account for urban effects, and conversely urban scale models do not account for mesoscale weather features or atmospheric physics. The ultimate goal of this research is to develop and implement an immersed boundary method (IBM) along with a surface roughness parameterization into the mesoscale Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. IBM will be used in WRF to represent the complex boundary conditions imposed by urban landscapes, while still including forcing from regional weather patterns and atmospheric physics. This document details preliminary results of this research, including the details of three distinct implementations of the immersed boundary method. Results for the three methods are presented for the case of a rotation influenced neutral atmospheric boundary layer over flat terrain.

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
900883
Report Number(s):
UCRL-TH-226657
TRN: US200711%%628
DOE Contract Number:  
W-7405-ENG-48
Resource Type:
Thesis/Dissertation
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
42 ENGINEERING; BOUNDARY CONDITIONS; BOUNDARY LAYERS; FORECASTING; IMPLEMENTATION; PHYSICS; ROTATION; ROUGHNESS; SCALE MODELS; WEATHER

Citation Formats

Lundquist, Katherine Ann. Implementation of the Immersed Boundary Method in the Weather Research and Forecasting model. United States: N. p., 2006. Web. doi:10.2172/900883.
Lundquist, Katherine Ann. Implementation of the Immersed Boundary Method in the Weather Research and Forecasting model. United States. doi:10.2172/900883.
Lundquist, Katherine Ann. Sun . "Implementation of the Immersed Boundary Method in the Weather Research and Forecasting model". United States. doi:10.2172/900883. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/900883.
@article{osti_900883,
title = {Implementation of the Immersed Boundary Method in the Weather Research and Forecasting model},
author = {Lundquist, Katherine Ann},
abstractNote = {Accurate simulations of atmospheric boundary layer flow are vital for predicting dispersion of contaminant releases, particularly in densely populated urban regions where first responders must react within minutes and the consequences of forecast errors are potentially disastrous. Current mesoscale models do not account for urban effects, and conversely urban scale models do not account for mesoscale weather features or atmospheric physics. The ultimate goal of this research is to develop and implement an immersed boundary method (IBM) along with a surface roughness parameterization into the mesoscale Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. IBM will be used in WRF to represent the complex boundary conditions imposed by urban landscapes, while still including forcing from regional weather patterns and atmospheric physics. This document details preliminary results of this research, including the details of three distinct implementations of the immersed boundary method. Results for the three methods are presented for the case of a rotation influenced neutral atmospheric boundary layer over flat terrain.},
doi = {10.2172/900883},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2006},
month = {Sun Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2006}
}

Thesis/Dissertation:
Other availability
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