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Title: Development and Application of a Predictive Computational Tool for Short-Pulse, High-Intensity Target Interactions

Abstract

The widely differing spatial, temporal, and density scales needed to accurately model the fast ignition process and other short-pulse laser-plasma interactions leads to a computationally challenging project that is difficult to solve using a single code. This report summarizes the work performed on a three year LDRD to couple together three independent codes using PYTHON to build a new integrated computational tool. An example calculation using this new model is described.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
900863
Report Number(s):
UCRL-TR-227795
TRN: US0702421
DOE Contract Number:
W-7405-ENG-48
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
70 PLASMA PHYSICS AND FUSION; 42 ENGINEERING; IGNITION; TARGETS; PHYSICS; ENGINEERING

Citation Formats

Town, R J, Chung, H, Langdon, A B, Lasinski, B F, Lund, S M, McCandless, B C, Still, C H, and Tabak, M. Development and Application of a Predictive Computational Tool for Short-Pulse, High-Intensity Target Interactions. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.2172/900863.
Town, R J, Chung, H, Langdon, A B, Lasinski, B F, Lund, S M, McCandless, B C, Still, C H, & Tabak, M. Development and Application of a Predictive Computational Tool for Short-Pulse, High-Intensity Target Interactions. United States. doi:10.2172/900863.
Town, R J, Chung, H, Langdon, A B, Lasinski, B F, Lund, S M, McCandless, B C, Still, C H, and Tabak, M. Fri . "Development and Application of a Predictive Computational Tool for Short-Pulse, High-Intensity Target Interactions". United States. doi:10.2172/900863. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/900863.
@article{osti_900863,
title = {Development and Application of a Predictive Computational Tool for Short-Pulse, High-Intensity Target Interactions},
author = {Town, R J and Chung, H and Langdon, A B and Lasinski, B F and Lund, S M and McCandless, B C and Still, C H and Tabak, M},
abstractNote = {The widely differing spatial, temporal, and density scales needed to accurately model the fast ignition process and other short-pulse laser-plasma interactions leads to a computationally challenging project that is difficult to solve using a single code. This report summarizes the work performed on a three year LDRD to couple together three independent codes using PYTHON to build a new integrated computational tool. An example calculation using this new model is described.},
doi = {10.2172/900863},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Jan 26 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Fri Jan 26 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}

Technical Report:

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