skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: RETENTION TIME EFFECT ON METAL REMOVAL BY PEAT COLUMNS

Abstract

The potential use of a peat bed to treat the H-12 Outfall discharge to bring it to new compliance limits was previously investigated and reported utilizing a 7 hour retention time. The influence of retention time (contact time) of water with peat moss on the removal of copper from the water was investigated under laboratory conditions using vertical flow peat moss columns. Reduction of the necessary retention time has a large influence on the design sizing of any peat bed that would be constructed to treat the H-12 discharge on a full scale basis. Retention times of 5 hours, 3 hours and 1 hour were tested to determine the copper removal by the peat columns using vertical flow. Water samples were collected after 4, 8, 12, and 16 water volumes had passed through the columns and analyzed for a suite of metals, with quantitative emphasis on copper. Laboratory results indicated that copper removal was very high at each of the 3 retention times tested, ranging from 99.6 % removal at 5 and 3 hours to 98.8% removal at 1 hour. All these values are much lower that the new compliance limit for the outfall. The results also indicated that mostmore » divalent metals were removed to their normal reporting detection limit for the analytical methods used, including zinc. Lead levels in the H-12 discharge used in this study were below PQL in all samples analyzed. While each of the retention times studied removed copper very well, there were indications that 1 hour is probably too short for an operational, long-term facility. At that retention time, there was about 6% compaction of the peat in the column due to the water velocity, and this may affect long term hydraulic conductivity of the peat bed. At that retention time, copper concentration in the effluent was higher than the other times tested, although still very low. Because of the potential compacting and somewhat reduced removal efficiency at a 1 hour retention time, it would be prudent to design to at least a 3 hour retention time for water in any peat bed system that is proposed for the H-12 Outfall. A scope to design and install a pilot level study at H-12 is currently under development. This study will be designed to examine some of the engineering issues that are of concern regarding the scaling of an actual peat bed to treat the volumes of water that are typically discharged through the H-12 Outfall. Different hydraulic paths and configurations are expected to be part of that scope.« less

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
SRS
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
900804
Report Number(s):
WSRC-STI-2007-00089
TRN: US200711%%716
DOE Contract Number:  
DE-AC09-96SR18500
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
01 COAL, LIGNITE, AND PEAT; COMPACTING; COMPLIANCE; COPPER; DESIGN; EFFICIENCY; HYDRAULIC CONDUCTIVITY; HYDRAULICS; PEAT; REMOVAL; RETENTION; SENSITIVITY; SIZE; VELOCITY; WATER; ZINC

Citation Formats

Nelson, E. RETENTION TIME EFFECT ON METAL REMOVAL BY PEAT COLUMNS. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.2172/900804.
Nelson, E. RETENTION TIME EFFECT ON METAL REMOVAL BY PEAT COLUMNS. United States. doi:10.2172/900804.
Nelson, E. Wed . "RETENTION TIME EFFECT ON METAL REMOVAL BY PEAT COLUMNS". United States. doi:10.2172/900804. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/900804.
@article{osti_900804,
title = {RETENTION TIME EFFECT ON METAL REMOVAL BY PEAT COLUMNS},
author = {Nelson, E},
abstractNote = {The potential use of a peat bed to treat the H-12 Outfall discharge to bring it to new compliance limits was previously investigated and reported utilizing a 7 hour retention time. The influence of retention time (contact time) of water with peat moss on the removal of copper from the water was investigated under laboratory conditions using vertical flow peat moss columns. Reduction of the necessary retention time has a large influence on the design sizing of any peat bed that would be constructed to treat the H-12 discharge on a full scale basis. Retention times of 5 hours, 3 hours and 1 hour were tested to determine the copper removal by the peat columns using vertical flow. Water samples were collected after 4, 8, 12, and 16 water volumes had passed through the columns and analyzed for a suite of metals, with quantitative emphasis on copper. Laboratory results indicated that copper removal was very high at each of the 3 retention times tested, ranging from 99.6 % removal at 5 and 3 hours to 98.8% removal at 1 hour. All these values are much lower that the new compliance limit for the outfall. The results also indicated that most divalent metals were removed to their normal reporting detection limit for the analytical methods used, including zinc. Lead levels in the H-12 discharge used in this study were below PQL in all samples analyzed. While each of the retention times studied removed copper very well, there were indications that 1 hour is probably too short for an operational, long-term facility. At that retention time, there was about 6% compaction of the peat in the column due to the water velocity, and this may affect long term hydraulic conductivity of the peat bed. At that retention time, copper concentration in the effluent was higher than the other times tested, although still very low. Because of the potential compacting and somewhat reduced removal efficiency at a 1 hour retention time, it would be prudent to design to at least a 3 hour retention time for water in any peat bed system that is proposed for the H-12 Outfall. A scope to design and install a pilot level study at H-12 is currently under development. This study will be designed to examine some of the engineering issues that are of concern regarding the scaling of an actual peat bed to treat the volumes of water that are typically discharged through the H-12 Outfall. Different hydraulic paths and configurations are expected to be part of that scope.},
doi = {10.2172/900804},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Feb 28 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Wed Feb 28 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}

Technical Report:

Save / Share: