skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Induced water condensation and bridge formation by electric fieldsin Atomic Force Microscopy

Abstract

We present an analytical model that explains how in humidenvironments the electric field near a sharp tip enhances the formationof water meniscii and bridges between tip and sample. The predictions ofthe model are compared with experimental measurements of the criticaldistance where the field strength causes bridge formation.

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley NationalLaboratory, Berkeley, CA (US)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Director. Office of Science. Office of AdvancedScientific Computing Research. Office of Basic Energy Sciences. MaterialsSciences and Engineering Division
OSTI Identifier:
900789
Report Number(s):
LBNL-59746
R&D Project: 517950; BnR: KC0203010; TRN: US200711%%612
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC02-05CH11231
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Journal of Physical Chemistry B; Journal Volume: 110; Journal Issue: 30; Related Information: Journal Publication Date: 2006
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36; ATOMIC FORCE MICROSCOPY; ELECTRIC FIELDS; WATER; Capillarity Electric field Scanning Probe Microscopy Waterbridge formation

Citation Formats

Sacha, G.M., Verdaguer, A., and Salmeron, M.. Induced water condensation and bridge formation by electric fieldsin Atomic Force Microscopy. United States: N. p., 2006. Web. doi:10.1021/jp061148t.
Sacha, G.M., Verdaguer, A., & Salmeron, M.. Induced water condensation and bridge formation by electric fieldsin Atomic Force Microscopy. United States. doi:10.1021/jp061148t.
Sacha, G.M., Verdaguer, A., and Salmeron, M.. Wed . "Induced water condensation and bridge formation by electric fieldsin Atomic Force Microscopy". United States. doi:10.1021/jp061148t. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/900789.
@article{osti_900789,
title = {Induced water condensation and bridge formation by electric fieldsin Atomic Force Microscopy},
author = {Sacha, G.M. and Verdaguer, A. and Salmeron, M.},
abstractNote = {We present an analytical model that explains how in humidenvironments the electric field near a sharp tip enhances the formationof water meniscii and bridges between tip and sample. The predictions ofthe model are compared with experimental measurements of the criticaldistance where the field strength causes bridge formation.},
doi = {10.1021/jp061148t},
journal = {Journal of Physical Chemistry B},
number = 30,
volume = 110,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Feb 22 00:00:00 EST 2006},
month = {Wed Feb 22 00:00:00 EST 2006}
}
  • In this paper, atomic force microscopy (AFM) force-distance measurements are used to investigate the layered ion structure of Ionic Liquids (ILs) at the mica surface. The effects of various tip properties on the measured force profiles are examined and reveal that the measured ion position is independent of tip properties, while the tip radius affects the forces required to break through the ion layers as well as the adhesion force. Force data is collected for different ILs and directly compared with interfacial ion density profiles predicted by molecular dynamics. Through this comparison it is concluded that AFM force measurements aremore » sensitive to the position of the ion with the larger volume and mass, suggesting that ion selectivity in force-distance measurements are related to excluded volume effects and not to electrostatic or chemical interactions between ions and AFM tip. Finally, the comparison also revealed that at distances greater than 1 nm the system maintains overall electroneutrality between the AFM tip and sample, while at smaller distances other forces (e.g., van der waals interactions) dominate and electroneutrality is no longer maintained.« less
  • Recent advancement in dynamic-mode atomic force microscopy (AFM) has enabled its operation in liquid with atomic-scale resolution. However, its imaging speed has often been too slow to visualize atomic-scale dynamic processes. Here, we propose a method for making a significant improvement in the operation speed of dynamic-mode AFM. In this method, we use a wideband and low-latency phase detector with an improved algorithm for the signal complexification. We demonstrate atomic-scale imaging of a calcite crystal growth process in water at one frame per second. The significant improvement in the imaging speed should enable various studies on unexplored atomic-scale interfacial processes.
  • A systematic study of electric transport through thin (2-8 nm) CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} films deposited on epitaxial SrRuO{sub 3} bottom electrodes was performed by conducting atomic force microscopy (CAFM). Experimental procedures to investigate transport through thin insulating films by CAFM are critically revised, and the potential of CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} films for the use as spin-filtering barriers is assessed. It is concluded that, at room-temperature, a non-tunnel channel significantly contributes to the electric transport, thus limiting the spin-filtering efficiency.
  • Triglycine sulfate crystals with an ideal (010) cleavage plane are used as model objects to reveal problems in interpreting atomic force microscopy (AFM) images of surfaces with nonuniform charge distribution. Specific microrelief features of two types are found: lenslike formations with different contrast and rounded protrusions/valleys of different size but fixed height. An analysis of their evolution with a change in temperature and under an electric field and mechanical impacts has made it possible to separate relief elements from the crystal domain structure. The interpretation proposed is confirmed by the multimode AFM data. The specific features of the images ofmore » dynamic domains and aged domains (which cannot undergo polarization reversal) are studied. The domain-wall width found in the AFM measurements depends on the technique used and the specificity of probe-surface interaction; it varies from 9 to 2000 nm. The most reliable data on the domain-wall width in triglycine sulfate crystals are provided by piezoelectric force microscopy, according to which the wall width does not exceed 30 nm.« less