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Title: The farthest known supernova: Support for an accelerating universeand a glimpse of the epoch of deceleration

Abstract

We present photometric observations of an apparent Type Iasupernova (SN Ia) at a redshift of approximately 1.7, the farthest SNobserved to date. The supernova, SN 1997, was discovered in a repeatobservation by the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) of the Hubble DeepField{North (HDF-N), and serendipitously monitored with NICMOS on HSTthroughout the Thompson et al. GTO campaign. The SN type can bedetermined from the host galaxy type: an evolved, red elliptical lackingenough recent star formation to provide a significant population ofcore-collapse supernovae. The classification is further supported bydiagnostics available from the observed colors and temporal behavior ofthe SN, both of which match a typical SN Ia. The photometric record ofthe SN includes a dozen flux measurements in the I, J, and H bandsspanning 35 days in the observed frame. The redshift derived from the SNphotometry, z = 1:7 plus or minus 0:1, is in excellent agreement with theredshift estimate of z = 1:65 plus or minus 0:15 derived from the U_300B_450 V_-606 I_814 J_110 J_125 H_160 H_165 K_s photometry of the galaxy.Optical and near-infrared spectra of the host provide a very tentativespectroscopic redshift of 1.755. Fits to observations of the SN provideconstraints for the redshift-distance relation of SNe Ia and a powerfultestmore » of the current accelerating Universe hypothesis. The apparent SNbrightness is consistent with that expected in the decelerating phase ofthe preferred cosmological model, Omega_M approximately equal to 1/3;Omega_Lambda approximately equal to 2/3. It is inconsistent with greydust or simple luminosity evolution, candidate astrophysical effectswhich could mimic previous evidence for an accelerating Universe from SNeIa at z approximately equal to 0:5. We consider several sources ofpotential systematic error including gravitational lensing, supernovamisclassification, sample selection bias, and luminosity calibrationerrors. Currently, none of these effects alone appears likely tochallenge our conclusions. Additional SNe Ia at z>1 will be requiredto test more exotic alternatives to the accelerating Universe hypothesisand to probe the nature of dark energy.« less

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley NationalLaboratory, Berkeley, CA (US)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Director, Office of Science. Office of High Energy andNuclear Physics. Division of High Energy Physics
OSTI Identifier:
900683
Report Number(s):
LBNL-48321
Journal ID: ISSN 0004-637X; ASJOAB; R&D Project: 419401; TRN: US0702365
DOE Contract Number:  
DE-AC02-05CH11231
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Astrophysical Journal
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 559; Journal Issue: 1; Related Information: Journal Publication Date: Sep 20 2001; Journal ID: ISSN 0004-637X
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
72 PHYSICS OF ELEMENTARY PARTICLES AND FIELDS; ACCELERATION; BRIGHTNESS; CALIBRATION; CLASSIFICATION; COSMOLOGICAL MODELS; DUSTS; HYPOTHESIS; LUMINOSITY; PHOTOMETRY; PROBES; SPECTRA; STARS; SUPERNOVAE; TELESCOPES; UNIVERSE; cosmology supernovae

Citation Formats

Riess, Adam G., Nugent, Peter E., Schmidt, Brian P., Tonry, John, Dickinson, Mark, Gilliland, Ronald L., Thompson, Rodger I., Budavari,Tamas, Casertano, Stefano, Evans, Aaron S., Filippenko, Alexei V., Livio,Mario, Sanders, David B., Shapley, Alice E., Spinrad, Hyron, Steidel,Charles C., Stern, Daniel, Surace, Jason, and Veilleux, Sylvain. The farthest known supernova: Support for an accelerating universeand a glimpse of the epoch of deceleration. United States: N. p., 2001. Web. doi:10.1086/322348.
Riess, Adam G., Nugent, Peter E., Schmidt, Brian P., Tonry, John, Dickinson, Mark, Gilliland, Ronald L., Thompson, Rodger I., Budavari,Tamas, Casertano, Stefano, Evans, Aaron S., Filippenko, Alexei V., Livio,Mario, Sanders, David B., Shapley, Alice E., Spinrad, Hyron, Steidel,Charles C., Stern, Daniel, Surace, Jason, & Veilleux, Sylvain. The farthest known supernova: Support for an accelerating universeand a glimpse of the epoch of deceleration. United States. doi:10.1086/322348.
Riess, Adam G., Nugent, Peter E., Schmidt, Brian P., Tonry, John, Dickinson, Mark, Gilliland, Ronald L., Thompson, Rodger I., Budavari,Tamas, Casertano, Stefano, Evans, Aaron S., Filippenko, Alexei V., Livio,Mario, Sanders, David B., Shapley, Alice E., Spinrad, Hyron, Steidel,Charles C., Stern, Daniel, Surace, Jason, and Veilleux, Sylvain. Sun . "The farthest known supernova: Support for an accelerating universeand a glimpse of the epoch of deceleration". United States. doi:10.1086/322348. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/900683.
@article{osti_900683,
title = {The farthest known supernova: Support for an accelerating universeand a glimpse of the epoch of deceleration},
author = {Riess, Adam G. and Nugent, Peter E. and Schmidt, Brian P. and Tonry, John and Dickinson, Mark and Gilliland, Ronald L. and Thompson, Rodger I. and Budavari,Tamas and Casertano, Stefano and Evans, Aaron S. and Filippenko, Alexei V. and Livio,Mario and Sanders, David B. and Shapley, Alice E. and Spinrad, Hyron and Steidel,Charles C. and Stern, Daniel and Surace, Jason and Veilleux, Sylvain},
abstractNote = {We present photometric observations of an apparent Type Iasupernova (SN Ia) at a redshift of approximately 1.7, the farthest SNobserved to date. The supernova, SN 1997, was discovered in a repeatobservation by the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) of the Hubble DeepField{North (HDF-N), and serendipitously monitored with NICMOS on HSTthroughout the Thompson et al. GTO campaign. The SN type can bedetermined from the host galaxy type: an evolved, red elliptical lackingenough recent star formation to provide a significant population ofcore-collapse supernovae. The classification is further supported bydiagnostics available from the observed colors and temporal behavior ofthe SN, both of which match a typical SN Ia. The photometric record ofthe SN includes a dozen flux measurements in the I, J, and H bandsspanning 35 days in the observed frame. The redshift derived from the SNphotometry, z = 1:7 plus or minus 0:1, is in excellent agreement with theredshift estimate of z = 1:65 plus or minus 0:15 derived from the U_300B_450 V_-606 I_814 J_110 J_125 H_160 H_165 K_s photometry of the galaxy.Optical and near-infrared spectra of the host provide a very tentativespectroscopic redshift of 1.755. Fits to observations of the SN provideconstraints for the redshift-distance relation of SNe Ia and a powerfultest of the current accelerating Universe hypothesis. The apparent SNbrightness is consistent with that expected in the decelerating phase ofthe preferred cosmological model, Omega_M approximately equal to 1/3;Omega_Lambda approximately equal to 2/3. It is inconsistent with greydust or simple luminosity evolution, candidate astrophysical effectswhich could mimic previous evidence for an accelerating Universe from SNeIa at z approximately equal to 0:5. We consider several sources ofpotential systematic error including gravitational lensing, supernovamisclassification, sample selection bias, and luminosity calibrationerrors. Currently, none of these effects alone appears likely tochallenge our conclusions. Additional SNe Ia at z>1 will be requiredto test more exotic alternatives to the accelerating Universe hypothesisand to probe the nature of dark energy.},
doi = {10.1086/322348},
journal = {Astrophysical Journal},
issn = {0004-637X},
number = 1,
volume = 559,
place = {United States},
year = {2001},
month = {4}
}