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Title: Research on Captive Broodstock Programs for Pacific Salmon, 2004-2005 Annual Report.

Abstract

The success of captive broodstock programs depends on high in-culture survival, appropriate development of the reproductive system, and the behavior and survival of cultured salmon after release, either as adults or juveniles. Continuing captive broodstock research designed to improve technology is being conducted to cover all major life history stages of Pacific salmon. Accomplishments detailed in this report and those since the last project review period (FY 2003) are listed below by major objective. Objective 1: (i) Developed tools for monitoring the spawning success of captively reared Chinook salmon that can now be used for evaluating the reintroduction success of ESA-listed captive broodstocks in their natal habitats. (ii) Developed an automated temperature controlled rearing system to test the effects of seawater rearing temperature on reproductive success of Chinook salmon. Objective 2: (i) Determined that Columbia River sockeye salmon imprint at multiple developmental stages and the length of exposure to home water is important for successful imprinting. These results can be utilized for developing successful reintroduction strategies to minimize straying by ESA-listed sockeye salmon. (ii) Developed behavioral and physiological assays for imprinting in sockeye salmon. Objective 3: (i) Developed growth regime to reduce age-two male maturation in spring Chinook salmon, (ii)more » described reproductive cycle of returning hatchery Snake River spring Chinook salmon relative to captive broodstock, and (iii) found delays in egg development in captive broodstock prior to entry to fresh water. (iv) Determined that loss of Redfish Lake sockeye embryos prior to hatch is largely due to lack of egg fertilization rather than embryonic mortality. Objective 4 : (i) Demonstrated safety and efficacy limits against bacterial kidney disease (BKD) in fall Chinook of attenuated R. salmoninarum vaccine and commercial vaccine Renogen, (ii) improved prophylactic and therapeutic efficacy of compound vaccine against BKD in fall Chinook and (iii) testing of broodstock antibiotic treatment in combination with compound vaccine against BKD. Objective 5: (i) Determined that close inbreeding in Chinook salmon led to substantial reductions in marine survival; progeny of half siblings survived at 90% the rate of noninbred fish and progeny of full siblings survived at only 15% the rate of noninbred fish. (ii) For two broods, 2002 and 2003, we established a breeding design involving 30 half- and 120 full-sib families of Chinook salmon to test the generality of these results.« less

Authors:
 [1]
  1. (National Marine Fisheries Service)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Marine Fisheries Service
Sponsoring Org.:
United States. Bonneville Power Administration.
OSTI Identifier:
900551
Report Number(s):
DOE/BP-00017690-1
R&D Project: 199305600; TRN: US200711%%696
DOE Contract Number:  
00017690
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; ADULTS; ANTIBIOTICS; BREEDING; COLUMBIA RIVER; DISEASES; EMBRYOS; FERTILIZATION; FRESH WATER; JUVENILES; KIDNEYS; MALES; MORTALITY; PROGENY; REARING; RIVERS; SALMON; TESTING; VACCINES; Pacific salmon - Physiology - Research; Pacific salmon - Breeding - Northwest, Pacific - Research

Citation Formats

Berejikian, Barry A. Research on Captive Broodstock Programs for Pacific Salmon, 2004-2005 Annual Report.. United States: N. p., 2005. Web. doi:10.2172/900551.
Berejikian, Barry A. Research on Captive Broodstock Programs for Pacific Salmon, 2004-2005 Annual Report.. United States. doi:10.2172/900551.
Berejikian, Barry A. Tue . "Research on Captive Broodstock Programs for Pacific Salmon, 2004-2005 Annual Report.". United States. doi:10.2172/900551. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/900551.
@article{osti_900551,
title = {Research on Captive Broodstock Programs for Pacific Salmon, 2004-2005 Annual Report.},
author = {Berejikian, Barry A.},
abstractNote = {The success of captive broodstock programs depends on high in-culture survival, appropriate development of the reproductive system, and the behavior and survival of cultured salmon after release, either as adults or juveniles. Continuing captive broodstock research designed to improve technology is being conducted to cover all major life history stages of Pacific salmon. Accomplishments detailed in this report and those since the last project review period (FY 2003) are listed below by major objective. Objective 1: (i) Developed tools for monitoring the spawning success of captively reared Chinook salmon that can now be used for evaluating the reintroduction success of ESA-listed captive broodstocks in their natal habitats. (ii) Developed an automated temperature controlled rearing system to test the effects of seawater rearing temperature on reproductive success of Chinook salmon. Objective 2: (i) Determined that Columbia River sockeye salmon imprint at multiple developmental stages and the length of exposure to home water is important for successful imprinting. These results can be utilized for developing successful reintroduction strategies to minimize straying by ESA-listed sockeye salmon. (ii) Developed behavioral and physiological assays for imprinting in sockeye salmon. Objective 3: (i) Developed growth regime to reduce age-two male maturation in spring Chinook salmon, (ii) described reproductive cycle of returning hatchery Snake River spring Chinook salmon relative to captive broodstock, and (iii) found delays in egg development in captive broodstock prior to entry to fresh water. (iv) Determined that loss of Redfish Lake sockeye embryos prior to hatch is largely due to lack of egg fertilization rather than embryonic mortality. Objective 4 : (i) Demonstrated safety and efficacy limits against bacterial kidney disease (BKD) in fall Chinook of attenuated R. salmoninarum vaccine and commercial vaccine Renogen, (ii) improved prophylactic and therapeutic efficacy of compound vaccine against BKD in fall Chinook and (iii) testing of broodstock antibiotic treatment in combination with compound vaccine against BKD. Objective 5: (i) Determined that close inbreeding in Chinook salmon led to substantial reductions in marine survival; progeny of half siblings survived at 90% the rate of noninbred fish and progeny of full siblings survived at only 15% the rate of noninbred fish. (ii) For two broods, 2002 and 2003, we established a breeding design involving 30 half- and 120 full-sib families of Chinook salmon to test the generality of these results.},
doi = {10.2172/900551},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Nov 01 00:00:00 EST 2005},
month = {Tue Nov 01 00:00:00 EST 2005}
}

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