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Title: Nanoporous gold as a highly active substrate for surface-enhanced Raman scattering spectroscopy

Abstract

Colloidal solutions of metal nanoparticles are currently among most studied substrates for sensors based on surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). However, such substrates often suffer from not being cost-effective, reusable, or stable. Here, we develop nanoporous Au as a highly active, tunable, a.ordable, stable, bio-compatible, and reusable SERS substrate. Nanoporous Au is prepared by a facile process of free corrosion of AgAu alloys followed by annealing. Results show that nanofoams with average pore sizes of {approx} 250 nm exhibit the largest SERS signal for 632.8 nm excitation. This is attributed to the electromagnetic SERS enhancement mechanism with additional field localization within pores.

Authors:
; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
900430
Report Number(s):
UCRL-JRNL-220317
Journal ID: ISSN 0003-6951; APPLAB; TRN: US200711%%126
DOE Contract Number:
W-7405-ENG-48
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Applied Physics Letters, vol. 89, no. 053102, July 31, 2006, pp. 3; Journal Volume: 89; Journal Issue: 053102
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; ALLOYS; ANNEALING; CORROSION; EXCITATION; GOLD; SCATTERING; SPECTROSCOPY; SUBSTRATES

Citation Formats

Kucheyev, S O, Hayes, J R, Biener, J, and Hamza, A V. Nanoporous gold as a highly active substrate for surface-enhanced Raman scattering spectroscopy. United States: N. p., 2006. Web.
Kucheyev, S O, Hayes, J R, Biener, J, & Hamza, A V. Nanoporous gold as a highly active substrate for surface-enhanced Raman scattering spectroscopy. United States.
Kucheyev, S O, Hayes, J R, Biener, J, and Hamza, A V. Tue . "Nanoporous gold as a highly active substrate for surface-enhanced Raman scattering spectroscopy". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/900430.
@article{osti_900430,
title = {Nanoporous gold as a highly active substrate for surface-enhanced Raman scattering spectroscopy},
author = {Kucheyev, S O and Hayes, J R and Biener, J and Hamza, A V},
abstractNote = {Colloidal solutions of metal nanoparticles are currently among most studied substrates for sensors based on surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). However, such substrates often suffer from not being cost-effective, reusable, or stable. Here, we develop nanoporous Au as a highly active, tunable, a.ordable, stable, bio-compatible, and reusable SERS substrate. Nanoporous Au is prepared by a facile process of free corrosion of AgAu alloys followed by annealing. Results show that nanofoams with average pore sizes of {approx} 250 nm exhibit the largest SERS signal for 632.8 nm excitation. This is attributed to the electromagnetic SERS enhancement mechanism with additional field localization within pores.},
doi = {},
journal = {Applied Physics Letters, vol. 89, no. 053102, July 31, 2006, pp. 3},
number = 053102,
volume = 89,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Mar 28 00:00:00 EST 2006},
month = {Tue Mar 28 00:00:00 EST 2006}
}
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