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Title: Simulating human behavior for national security human interactions.

Abstract

This 3-year research and development effort focused on what we believe is a significant technical gap in existing modeling and simulation capabilities: the representation of plausible human cognition and behaviors within a dynamic, simulated environment. Specifically, the intent of the ''Simulating Human Behavior for National Security Human Interactions'' project was to demonstrate initial simulated human modeling capability that realistically represents intra- and inter-group interaction behaviors between simulated humans and human-controlled avatars as they respond to their environment. Significant process was made towards simulating human behaviors through the development of a framework that produces realistic characteristics and movement. The simulated humans were created from models designed to be psychologically plausible by being based on robust psychological research and theory. Progress was also made towards enhancing Sandia National Laboratories existing cognitive models to support culturally plausible behaviors that are important in representing group interactions. These models were implemented in the modular, interoperable, and commercially supported Umbra{reg_sign} simulation framework.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Sandia National Laboratories
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
900422
Report Number(s):
SAND2006-7812
TRN: US200711%%324
DOE Contract Number:
AC04-94AL85000
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
45 MILITARY TECHNOLOGY, WEAPONRY, AND NATIONAL DEFENSE; NATIONAL SECURITY; SANDIA NATIONAL LABORATORIES; SIMULATION; BEHAVIOR; National security-Decision making.; Human behavior.; Human information processing.; Social interaction

Citation Formats

Bernard, Michael Lewis, Hart, Dereck H., Verzi, Stephen J., Glickman, Matthew R., Wolfenbarger, Paul R., and Xavier, Patrick Gordon. Simulating human behavior for national security human interactions.. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.2172/900422.
Bernard, Michael Lewis, Hart, Dereck H., Verzi, Stephen J., Glickman, Matthew R., Wolfenbarger, Paul R., & Xavier, Patrick Gordon. Simulating human behavior for national security human interactions.. United States. doi:10.2172/900422.
Bernard, Michael Lewis, Hart, Dereck H., Verzi, Stephen J., Glickman, Matthew R., Wolfenbarger, Paul R., and Xavier, Patrick Gordon. Mon . "Simulating human behavior for national security human interactions.". United States. doi:10.2172/900422. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/900422.
@article{osti_900422,
title = {Simulating human behavior for national security human interactions.},
author = {Bernard, Michael Lewis and Hart, Dereck H. and Verzi, Stephen J. and Glickman, Matthew R. and Wolfenbarger, Paul R. and Xavier, Patrick Gordon},
abstractNote = {This 3-year research and development effort focused on what we believe is a significant technical gap in existing modeling and simulation capabilities: the representation of plausible human cognition and behaviors within a dynamic, simulated environment. Specifically, the intent of the ''Simulating Human Behavior for National Security Human Interactions'' project was to demonstrate initial simulated human modeling capability that realistically represents intra- and inter-group interaction behaviors between simulated humans and human-controlled avatars as they respond to their environment. Significant process was made towards simulating human behaviors through the development of a framework that produces realistic characteristics and movement. The simulated humans were created from models designed to be psychologically plausible by being based on robust psychological research and theory. Progress was also made towards enhancing Sandia National Laboratories existing cognitive models to support culturally plausible behaviors that are important in representing group interactions. These models were implemented in the modular, interoperable, and commercially supported Umbra{reg_sign} simulation framework.},
doi = {10.2172/900422},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}

Technical Report:

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