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Title: High voltage, high temperature power electronics for electric utility applications.

Abstract

No abstract prepared.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Sandia National Laboratories
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
900407
Report Number(s):
SAND2006-3203C
TRN: US200711%%30
DOE Contract Number:
AC04-94AL85000
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Proposed for presentation at the IMAPS International Conference and Exhibition on High Temperature Electronics held May 15-18, 2006 in Santa Fe, NM.
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
42 ENGINEERING; ELECTRIC UTILITIES; ELECTRONIC EQUIPMENT; HEAT RESISTANT MATERIALS; ELECTRIC POTENTIAL

Citation Formats

Atcitty, Stanley. High voltage, high temperature power electronics for electric utility applications.. United States: N. p., 2006. Web.
Atcitty, Stanley. High voltage, high temperature power electronics for electric utility applications.. United States.
Atcitty, Stanley. Mon . "High voltage, high temperature power electronics for electric utility applications.". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_900407,
title = {High voltage, high temperature power electronics for electric utility applications.},
author = {Atcitty, Stanley},
abstractNote = {No abstract prepared.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon May 01 00:00:00 EDT 2006},
month = {Mon May 01 00:00:00 EDT 2006}
}

Conference:
Other availability
Please see Document Availability for additional information on obtaining the full-text document. Library patrons may search WorldCat to identify libraries that hold this conference proceeding.

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