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Title: Reproductive ecology of a federally endangered legume, Baptisia arachnifera, and its more widespread congener, B. lanceolata (Fabaceae)

Abstract

No abstract prepared.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Savannah River Ecology Laboratory (SREL), Aiken, SC
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
900339
Report Number(s):
SREL-3019
Journal ID: ISSN 0002-9122; AJBOAA; TRN: US200711%%7
DOE Contract Number:
DE-FC09-07SR22506
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: American Journal of Botany; Journal Volume: 94
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; ECOLOGY; LEGUMINOSAE; REPRODUCTION

Citation Formats

Young, A.S., S. Chang and R.R. Sharitz. Reproductive ecology of a federally endangered legume, Baptisia arachnifera, and its more widespread congener, B. lanceolata (Fabaceae). United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.3732/ajb.94.2.228.
Young, A.S., S. Chang and R.R. Sharitz. Reproductive ecology of a federally endangered legume, Baptisia arachnifera, and its more widespread congener, B. lanceolata (Fabaceae). United States. doi:10.3732/ajb.94.2.228.
Young, A.S., S. Chang and R.R. Sharitz. Mon . "Reproductive ecology of a federally endangered legume, Baptisia arachnifera, and its more widespread congener, B. lanceolata (Fabaceae)". United States. doi:10.3732/ajb.94.2.228.
@article{osti_900339,
title = {Reproductive ecology of a federally endangered legume, Baptisia arachnifera, and its more widespread congener, B. lanceolata (Fabaceae)},
author = {Young, A.S., S. Chang and R.R. Sharitz},
abstractNote = {No abstract prepared.},
doi = {10.3732/ajb.94.2.228},
journal = {American Journal of Botany},
number = ,
volume = 94,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}
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