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Title: Optics Performance at 1(omega), 2 (omega), and 3 (omega): Final Report on LDRD Project 03-ERD-071

Abstract

The interaction of intense laser light with dielectric materials is a fundamental applied science problem that is becoming increasingly important with the rapid development of ever more powerful lasers. To better understand the behavior of optical components in large fusion-class laser systems, we are systematically studying the interaction of high-fluence, high-power laser light with high-quality optical components, with particular interest on polishing/finishing and stress-induced defects and surface contamination. We focus on obtaining comparable measurements at three different wavelengths, 1{omega} (1053 nm), 2{omega} (527 nm), and 3{omega} (351 nm).

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
900136
Report Number(s):
UCRL-TR-218796
TRN: US200709%%546
DOE Contract Number:
W-7405-ENG-48
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; 71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; DEFECTS; DIELECTRIC MATERIALS; LASERS; OPTICS; PERFORMANCE; SURFACE CONTAMINATION; WAVELENGTHS

Citation Formats

Honig, J, Adams, J, Carr, C, Demos, S, Feit, M, Mehta, N, Norton, M, Nostrand, M, Rubenchik, A, and Spaeth, M. Optics Performance at 1(omega), 2 (omega), and 3 (omega): Final Report on LDRD Project 03-ERD-071. United States: N. p., 2006. Web. doi:10.2172/900136.
Honig, J, Adams, J, Carr, C, Demos, S, Feit, M, Mehta, N, Norton, M, Nostrand, M, Rubenchik, A, & Spaeth, M. Optics Performance at 1(omega), 2 (omega), and 3 (omega): Final Report on LDRD Project 03-ERD-071. United States. doi:10.2172/900136.
Honig, J, Adams, J, Carr, C, Demos, S, Feit, M, Mehta, N, Norton, M, Nostrand, M, Rubenchik, A, and Spaeth, M. Wed . "Optics Performance at 1(omega), 2 (omega), and 3 (omega): Final Report on LDRD Project 03-ERD-071". United States. doi:10.2172/900136. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/900136.
@article{osti_900136,
title = {Optics Performance at 1(omega), 2 (omega), and 3 (omega): Final Report on LDRD Project 03-ERD-071},
author = {Honig, J and Adams, J and Carr, C and Demos, S and Feit, M and Mehta, N and Norton, M and Nostrand, M and Rubenchik, A and Spaeth, M},
abstractNote = {The interaction of intense laser light with dielectric materials is a fundamental applied science problem that is becoming increasingly important with the rapid development of ever more powerful lasers. To better understand the behavior of optical components in large fusion-class laser systems, we are systematically studying the interaction of high-fluence, high-power laser light with high-quality optical components, with particular interest on polishing/finishing and stress-induced defects and surface contamination. We focus on obtaining comparable measurements at three different wavelengths, 1{omega} (1053 nm), 2{omega} (527 nm), and 3{omega} (351 nm).},
doi = {10.2172/900136},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Feb 08 00:00:00 EST 2006},
month = {Wed Feb 08 00:00:00 EST 2006}
}

Technical Report:

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