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Title: Sample Proficiency Test exercise

Abstract

The current format of the OPCW proficiency tests has multiple sets of 2 samples sent to an analysis laboratory. In each sample set, one is identified as a sample, the other as a blank. This method of conducting proficiency tests differs from how an OPCW designated laboratory would receive authentic samples (a set of three containers, each not identified, consisting of the authentic sample, a control sample, and a blank sample). This exercise was designed to test the reporting if the proficiency tests were to be conducted. As such, this is not an official OPCW proficiency test, and the attached report is one method by which LLNL might report their analyses under a more realistic testing scheme. Therefore, the title on the report ''Report of the Umpteenth Official OPCW Proficiency Test'' is meaningless, and provides a bit of whimsy for the analyses and readers of the report.

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
900123
Report Number(s):
UCRL-TR-218830
TRN: US200709%%539
DOE Contract Number:
W-7405-ENG-48
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; CONTAINERS; LAWRENCE LIVERMORE NATIONAL LABORATORY; TESTING

Citation Formats

Alcaraz, A, Gregg, H, and Koester, C. Sample Proficiency Test exercise. United States: N. p., 2006. Web. doi:10.2172/900123.
Alcaraz, A, Gregg, H, & Koester, C. Sample Proficiency Test exercise. United States. doi:10.2172/900123.
Alcaraz, A, Gregg, H, and Koester, C. Sun . "Sample Proficiency Test exercise". United States. doi:10.2172/900123. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/900123.
@article{osti_900123,
title = {Sample Proficiency Test exercise},
author = {Alcaraz, A and Gregg, H and Koester, C},
abstractNote = {The current format of the OPCW proficiency tests has multiple sets of 2 samples sent to an analysis laboratory. In each sample set, one is identified as a sample, the other as a blank. This method of conducting proficiency tests differs from how an OPCW designated laboratory would receive authentic samples (a set of three containers, each not identified, consisting of the authentic sample, a control sample, and a blank sample). This exercise was designed to test the reporting if the proficiency tests were to be conducted. As such, this is not an official OPCW proficiency test, and the attached report is one method by which LLNL might report their analyses under a more realistic testing scheme. Therefore, the title on the report ''Report of the Umpteenth Official OPCW Proficiency Test'' is meaningless, and provides a bit of whimsy for the analyses and readers of the report.},
doi = {10.2172/900123},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Feb 05 00:00:00 EST 2006},
month = {Sun Feb 05 00:00:00 EST 2006}
}

Technical Report:

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  • The Sixteenth Official OPCW Proficiency Test started in October 2004. The samples were prepared by scientists affiliated with the Forensic Science Center at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in Livermore, California, USA. The work was funded by the US Department of Energy. The test scenario and the spiking and background chemicals were discussed and agreed in advance with the OPCW. The samples were prepared in accordance with ''Work Instruction for the Preparation of Test Samples for OPCW Proficiency Tests'' (Document No.: QDOC/LAB/WI/PT2). The preparation of the test samples and their analysis are described in this report.
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