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Title: Structural Diagnostics of CFRP Composite Aircraft Components by Ultrasonic Guided Waves and Built-In Piezoelectric Transducers

Abstract

To monitor in-flight damage and reduce life-cycle costs associated with CFRP composite aircraft, an autonomous built-in structural health monitoring (SHM) system is preferred over conventional maintenance routines and schedules. This thesis investigates the use of ultrasonic guided waves and piezoelectric transducers for the identification and localization of damage/defects occurring within critical components of CFRP composite aircraft wings, mainly the wing skin-to-spar joints. The guided wave approach for structural diagnostics was demonstrated by the dual application of active and passive monitoring techniques. For active interrogation, the guided wave propagation problem was initially studied numerically by a semi-analytical finite element method, which accounts for viscoelastic damping, in order to identify ideal mode-frequency combinations sensitive to damage occurring within CFRP bonded joints. Active guided wave tests across three representative wing skin-to-spar joints at ambient temperature were then conducted using attached Macro Fiber Composite (MFC) transducers. Results from these experiments demonstrate the importance of intelligent feature extraction for improving the sensitivity to damage. To address the widely neglected effects of temperature on guided wave base damage identification, analytical and experimental analyses were performed to characterize the influence of temperature on guided wave signal features. In addition, statistically-robust detection of simulated damage in a CFRPmore » bonded joint was successfully achieved under changing temperature conditions through a dimensionally-low, multivariate statistical outlier analysis. The response of piezoceramic patches and MFC transducers to ultrasonic Rayleigh and Lamb wave fields was analytically derived and experimentally validated. This theory is useful for designing sensors which possess optimal sensitivity toward a given mode-frequency combination or for predicting the frequency dependent directivity patterns in a transducer's response. Based upon this theory, a novel approach was developed for passive damage and impact location in anisotropic or geometrically complex systems. The detection and location of simulated ''active'' damage or impacts was experimentally demonstrated on a scaled CFRP honeycomb sandwich wing skin using this technique.« less

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Univ. of California, San Diego, CA (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
899976
Report Number(s):
LA-14319-T
TRN: US200709%%160
DOE Contract Number:  
AC52-06NA25396
Resource Type:
Thesis/Dissertation
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
42 ENGINEERING; AIRCRAFT; FIBERS; FINITE ELEMENT METHOD; LIFE-CYCLE COST; TRANSDUCERS; ULTRASONIC WAVES; WAVE PROPAGATION; DEFECTS; DETECTION

Citation Formats

Matt, Howard M. Structural Diagnostics of CFRP Composite Aircraft Components by Ultrasonic Guided Waves and Built-In Piezoelectric Transducers. United States: N. p., 2006. Web. doi:10.2172/899976.
Matt, Howard M. Structural Diagnostics of CFRP Composite Aircraft Components by Ultrasonic Guided Waves and Built-In Piezoelectric Transducers. United States. doi:10.2172/899976.
Matt, Howard M. Sun . "Structural Diagnostics of CFRP Composite Aircraft Components by Ultrasonic Guided Waves and Built-In Piezoelectric Transducers". United States. doi:10.2172/899976. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/899976.
@article{osti_899976,
title = {Structural Diagnostics of CFRP Composite Aircraft Components by Ultrasonic Guided Waves and Built-In Piezoelectric Transducers},
author = {Matt, Howard M.},
abstractNote = {To monitor in-flight damage and reduce life-cycle costs associated with CFRP composite aircraft, an autonomous built-in structural health monitoring (SHM) system is preferred over conventional maintenance routines and schedules. This thesis investigates the use of ultrasonic guided waves and piezoelectric transducers for the identification and localization of damage/defects occurring within critical components of CFRP composite aircraft wings, mainly the wing skin-to-spar joints. The guided wave approach for structural diagnostics was demonstrated by the dual application of active and passive monitoring techniques. For active interrogation, the guided wave propagation problem was initially studied numerically by a semi-analytical finite element method, which accounts for viscoelastic damping, in order to identify ideal mode-frequency combinations sensitive to damage occurring within CFRP bonded joints. Active guided wave tests across three representative wing skin-to-spar joints at ambient temperature were then conducted using attached Macro Fiber Composite (MFC) transducers. Results from these experiments demonstrate the importance of intelligent feature extraction for improving the sensitivity to damage. To address the widely neglected effects of temperature on guided wave base damage identification, analytical and experimental analyses were performed to characterize the influence of temperature on guided wave signal features. In addition, statistically-robust detection of simulated damage in a CFRP bonded joint was successfully achieved under changing temperature conditions through a dimensionally-low, multivariate statistical outlier analysis. The response of piezoceramic patches and MFC transducers to ultrasonic Rayleigh and Lamb wave fields was analytically derived and experimentally validated. This theory is useful for designing sensors which possess optimal sensitivity toward a given mode-frequency combination or for predicting the frequency dependent directivity patterns in a transducer's response. Based upon this theory, a novel approach was developed for passive damage and impact location in anisotropic or geometrically complex systems. The detection and location of simulated ''active'' damage or impacts was experimentally demonstrated on a scaled CFRP honeycomb sandwich wing skin using this technique.},
doi = {10.2172/899976},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2006},
month = {1}
}

Thesis/Dissertation:
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