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Title: The MiniBooNE Experiment

Abstract

Neutrino oscillations have been observed in three sectors : solar ({nu}{sub e} disappearance) [1], atmospheric ({nu}{sub {mu}} disappearance) [2], and accelerator ({bar {nu}}{sub {mu}} {yields} {bar {nu}}{sub e}) [3]. The probability for two-neutrino oscillation is a function of four variables : two are determined by the conditions of the experiment, and two are the quantities fit for when performing an oscillation search (sin{sup 2}(2{theta}) and {Delta}m{sup 2}). {Delta}m{sup 2} is the difference in squares of the mass states of the neutrinos ({Delta}m{sub 12}{sup 2} = m{sub 2}{sup 2}-m{sub 1}{sup 2}). If the observed oscillations only occur between neutrinos in the Standard Model a summation law of the {Delta}m{sup 2} is valid ({Delta}m{sub 13}{sup 2} = {Delta}m{sub 12}{sup 2} + {Delta}m{sub 23}{sup 2}). The observed oscillations do not follow this summation law. This implies one of the results is incorrect or there exists physics beyond the Standard Model. While the solar and atmospheric results have been confirmed by several different experiments, the accelerator based result, from the Los Alamos LSND experiment [3], has yet to be fully vetted. The MiniBooNE experiment [4], located at Fermi National Laboratory, is designed to fully explore the LSND result. MiniBooNE is in the final stagesmore » of performing a blind oscillation search ({nu}{sub {mu}} {yields} {nu}{sub e}) using neutrino data collected through November, 2005. A blind analysis is one in which you may analyze some of the information in all of the data, all of the information in some of the data, but not all of the information in all of the data. As MiniBooNE hasn't yet opened the box, this discussion will focus on the different components of MiniBooNE relevant for the oscillation analysis.« less

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), High Energy Physics (HEP) (SC-25)
OSTI Identifier:
899710
Report Number(s):
SSI-2006-T012
TRN: US200713%%119
DOE Contract Number:
AC02-07CH11359
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Presented at: 34th SLAC Summer Institute on Particle Physics (SSI 2006): The Next Fronterier: Exploring with the LHC. Menlo Park, California, 17-28 Jul 2006.
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
72 PHYSICS OF ELEMENTARY PARTICLES AND FIELDS; ACCELERATORS; NEUTRINO OSCILLATION; NEUTRINOS; OSCILLATIONS; PHYSICS; PROBABILITY; STANDARD MODEL; STANFORD LINEAR ACCELERATOR CENTER

Citation Formats

Ray, Heather L. The MiniBooNE Experiment. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1084/jem.20062606.
Ray, Heather L. The MiniBooNE Experiment. United States. doi:10.1084/jem.20062606.
Ray, Heather L. Mon . "The MiniBooNE Experiment". United States. doi:10.1084/jem.20062606. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/899710.
@article{osti_899710,
title = {The MiniBooNE Experiment},
author = {Ray, Heather L.},
abstractNote = {Neutrino oscillations have been observed in three sectors : solar ({nu}{sub e} disappearance) [1], atmospheric ({nu}{sub {mu}} disappearance) [2], and accelerator ({bar {nu}}{sub {mu}} {yields} {bar {nu}}{sub e}) [3]. The probability for two-neutrino oscillation is a function of four variables : two are determined by the conditions of the experiment, and two are the quantities fit for when performing an oscillation search (sin{sup 2}(2{theta}) and {Delta}m{sup 2}). {Delta}m{sup 2} is the difference in squares of the mass states of the neutrinos ({Delta}m{sub 12}{sup 2} = m{sub 2}{sup 2}-m{sub 1}{sup 2}). If the observed oscillations only occur between neutrinos in the Standard Model a summation law of the {Delta}m{sup 2} is valid ({Delta}m{sub 13}{sup 2} = {Delta}m{sub 12}{sup 2} + {Delta}m{sub 23}{sup 2}). The observed oscillations do not follow this summation law. This implies one of the results is incorrect or there exists physics beyond the Standard Model. While the solar and atmospheric results have been confirmed by several different experiments, the accelerator based result, from the Los Alamos LSND experiment [3], has yet to be fully vetted. The MiniBooNE experiment [4], located at Fermi National Laboratory, is designed to fully explore the LSND result. MiniBooNE is in the final stages of performing a blind oscillation search ({nu}{sub {mu}} {yields} {nu}{sub e}) using neutrino data collected through November, 2005. A blind analysis is one in which you may analyze some of the information in all of the data, all of the information in some of the data, but not all of the information in all of the data. As MiniBooNE hasn't yet opened the box, this discussion will focus on the different components of MiniBooNE relevant for the oscillation analysis.},
doi = {10.1084/jem.20062606},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}

Conference:
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  • This paper reviews the current status of the Fermilab mini-Booster neutrino experiment (MiniBooNE). The experiment began taking beam data in late August 2002. We describe the experiment, status of the beamline and detector, and show the first neutrino candidate events.
  • MiniBooNE is an experiment designed to refute or confirm the LSND {bar {nu}}{sub {mu}} {yields} {bar {nu}}{sub e} oscillation result. MiniBooNE will look for oscillations of {nu}{sub {mu}} {yields} {nu}{sub e} in a closed-box appearance analysis. MiniBooNE began collecting data in 2002, and is expected to continue data taking through 2005. Current MiniBooNE results are presented.
  • This paper provides a brief status report for Fermilab E-898, the mini-Booster Neutrino Experiment (mini-BooNE). Presently concentrating on construction activities associated with the beam and detector, the collaboration is looking forward to the day when data taking and analysis will more fully occupy its time. First beam is expected in the Spring of 2002, and initial results are anticipated in 2003.