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Title: Identification of Aircraft Hazards

Abstract

Aircraft hazards were determined to be potentially applicable to a repository at Yucca Mountain in ''Monitored Geological Repository External Events Hazards Screening Analysis'' (BSC 2005 [DIRS 174235], Section 6.4.1). That determination was conservatively based upon limited knowledge of flight data in the area of concern and upon crash data for aircraft of the type flying near Yucca Mountain. The purpose of this report is to identify specific aircraft hazards that may be applicable to a monitored geologic repository (MGR) at Yucca Mountain, using NUREG-0800, ''Standard Review Plan for the Review of Safety Analysis Reports for Nuclear Power Plants'' (NRC 1987 [DIRS 103124], Section 3.5.1.6), as guidance for the inclusion or exclusion of identified aircraft hazards. The intended use of this report is to provide inputs for further screening and analysis of identified aircraft hazards based upon the criteria that apply to Category 1 and Category 2 event sequence analyses as defined in 10 CFR 63.2 [DIRS 176544] (Section 4). The scope of this report includes the evaluation of military, private, and commercial use of airspace in the 100-mile regional setting of the repository at Yucca Mountain with the potential for reducing the regional setting to a more manageable size aftermore » consideration of applicable screening criteria (Section 7).« less

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Yucca Mountain Project, Las Vegas, Nevada
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
899282
Report Number(s):
000-30R-WHS0-00100-000-007, Rev. 07
ENG.20061024.0004, DC# 49616; TRN: US0702533
DOE Contract Number:
NA
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
12 MANAGEMENT OF RADIOACTIVE WASTES, AND NON-RADIOACTIVE WASTES FROM NUCLEAR FACILITIES; 29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY AND ECONOMY; AIRCRAFT; EVALUATION; NUCLEAR POWER; SAFETY ANALYSIS; YUCCA MOUNTAIN

Citation Formats

K. Ashley. Identification of Aircraft Hazards. United States: N. p., 2006. Web. doi:10.2172/899282.
K. Ashley. Identification of Aircraft Hazards. United States. doi:10.2172/899282.
K. Ashley. Fri . "Identification of Aircraft Hazards". United States. doi:10.2172/899282. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/899282.
@article{osti_899282,
title = {Identification of Aircraft Hazards},
author = {K. Ashley},
abstractNote = {Aircraft hazards were determined to be potentially applicable to a repository at Yucca Mountain in ''Monitored Geological Repository External Events Hazards Screening Analysis'' (BSC 2005 [DIRS 174235], Section 6.4.1). That determination was conservatively based upon limited knowledge of flight data in the area of concern and upon crash data for aircraft of the type flying near Yucca Mountain. The purpose of this report is to identify specific aircraft hazards that may be applicable to a monitored geologic repository (MGR) at Yucca Mountain, using NUREG-0800, ''Standard Review Plan for the Review of Safety Analysis Reports for Nuclear Power Plants'' (NRC 1987 [DIRS 103124], Section 3.5.1.6), as guidance for the inclusion or exclusion of identified aircraft hazards. The intended use of this report is to provide inputs for further screening and analysis of identified aircraft hazards based upon the criteria that apply to Category 1 and Category 2 event sequence analyses as defined in 10 CFR 63.2 [DIRS 176544] (Section 4). The scope of this report includes the evaluation of military, private, and commercial use of airspace in the 100-mile regional setting of the repository at Yucca Mountain with the potential for reducing the regional setting to a more manageable size after consideration of applicable screening criteria (Section 7).},
doi = {10.2172/899282},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Dec 08 00:00:00 EST 2006},
month = {Fri Dec 08 00:00:00 EST 2006}
}

Technical Report:

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  • Aircraft hazards were determined to be potentially applicable to a repository at Yucca Mountain in the ''Monitored Geological Repository External Events Hazards Screening Analysis'' (BSC 2004, Section 6.4.1). That determination was conservatively based on limited knowledge of flight data in the area of concern and on crash data for aircraft of the type flying near Yucca Mountain. The purpose of this report is to identify specific aircraft hazards that may be applicable to a Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) at Yucca Mountain using NUREG-0800, ''Standard Review Plan for the Review of Safety Analysis Reports for Nuclear Power Plants'' (NRC 1987, Sectionmore » 3.5.1.6), as guidance for the inclusion or exclusion of identified aircraft hazards. NUREG-0800 is being used here as a reference because some of the same considerations apply. The intended use of this report is to provide inputs for further screening and analysis of the identified aircraft hazards based on the criteria that apply to Category 1 and 2 event sequence analyses as defined in 10 CFR 63.2 (see Section 4). The scope of this technical report includes the evaluation of military, private, and commercial use of airspace in the 100-mile regional setting of the MGR at Yucca Mountain with the potential for reducing the regional setting to a more manageable size after consideration of applicable screening criteria (see Section 7).« less
  • The first part of the report provides background information on the occurrence of solar activity and the consequent sporadic production of electromagnetic and particle emissions from the sun. A summary is given of the current procedures for the forecasting of solar activity together with procedures used to verify these forecasts as currently available. A summary of current forecasting of radiation hazards as provided in support of the Concorde SST program is also given. The second part of the report describes a forecast message distribution system developed in conjunction with solar cosmic radiation forecasts and warnings of the Space Environment Laboratorymore » of NOAA for the Federal Aviation Administration's (FAA) Office of Aviation Medicine. The study analyzes the currently available and future aeronautical telecommunication system facilities to determine an optimum system to distribute forecasts to the preflight planning centers in the international flight service stations for polar-flying subsonic and supersonic transport (SST) type aircraft. Also recommended for the system are timely and reliable distribution of warnings to individual in-flight aircraft in polar areas by the responsible air traffic control authority.« less
  • Public health and safety hazards have been identified for five types of power plants: coal-fired, oil-fired steam turbine, combined cycle, combustion (gas) turbine, and geothermal. The results of the analysis show that air pollutants are the major hazard that affects the health and safety of the general public. A total of ninety plant hazards were identified for the five plant types. Each of these hazards were rated in six categories as to their affect on the general public. The criteria used in the analysis were: area/population exposed; duration; mitigation; quantity to toxicity ratio; nature of health effects; and public attitude.more » Even though ninety hazards were identified for the five plants analyzed, the large majority of hazards were similar for each plant. Highest ratings were given to the products of the combustion cycle or to hydrogen sulfide emissions from geothermal plants. Water pollution, cooling tower effects and noise received relatively low ratings. The highest rated of the infrequent or hypothetical hazards were those associated with potential fires, explosions, and chlorine releases at the plant. Hazards associated with major cooling water releases, water pollution and missiles received the lowest ratings. Since the results of the study clearly show that air pollutants are currently considered the most severe hazard, additional effort must be made to further understand the complex interactions of pollutants with man and his environment. Of particular importance is the determination of dose-response relationships for long term, low level exposure to air pollutants. (EDB)« less
  • Problems commonly encountered when toxicologic standards are applied to everyday worker exposures are demonstrated. The primary function of the industrial hygienist is to evaluate the workplace to insure a healthful environment for the worker. In general, this evaluation is accomplished by taking samples representative of the worker's environment, analyzing for contaminants of interest, and comparing the measured levels with appropriate standards. Control measures are instituted if contaminant levels are above the standard or some present fraction of the standard (NIOSH action level concept). Although the evaluation procedure may seem simple as described, it is a nontrivial task as demonstrated usingmore » the example of a recent evaluation of worker exposures during aircraft fuel cell maintenance.« less
  • This report is a collection of studies performed at Sandia National Laboratories in support of Phase One (inert debris) for the Risk and Lethality Commonality Team. This team was created by the Range Safety Group of the Range Commander`s Council to evaluate the safety issues for debris generated during flight tests and to develop debris safety criteria that can be adopted by the national ranges. Physiological data on the effects of debris impacts on people are presented. Log-normal curves are developed to relate the impact kinetic energy of fragments to the probability of fatality for people exposed in standing, sitting,more » or prone positions. Debris hazards to aircraft resulting from engine ingestion or penetration of a structure or windshield are discussed. The smallest mass fragments of aluminum, steel, and tungsten that may be hazardous to current aircraft are defined. Fragment penetration of the deck of a small ship or a pleasure craft is also considered. The smallest mass fragments of aluminum, steel, or tungsten that can penetrate decks are calculated.« less