skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Compaction of Ceramic Microspheres, Spherical Molybdenum Powder and Other Materials to 3 GPa

Abstract

Pressure-volume relationships were measured at room temperature for eight granular materials and one specimen of epoxy foam. The granular materials included hollow ceramic microspheres, spherical molybdenum powder, Ottawa sand, aluminum, copper, titanium and silicon carbide powders and glassy carbon spheres. Measurements were made to 0.9 GPa in a liquid medium press for all of the granular materials and to 3 GPa in a solid medium press for the ceramic microspheres and molybdenum powder. A single specimen of epoxy foam was compressed to 30 MPa in the liquid medium press. Bulk moduli were calculated as a function of pressure for the ceramic microspheres, the molybdenum powder and three other granular materials. The energy expended in compacting the granular materials was determined by numerically integrating pressure-volume curves. More energy was expended per unit volume in compacting the molybdenum powder to 1 GPa than for the other materials, but compaction of the ceramic microspheres required more energy per gram due to their very low initial density. The merge pressure, the pressure at which all porosity is removed, was estimated for each material by plotting porosity against pressure on a semi-log plot. The pressure-volume curves were then extrapolated to the predicted merge pressures andmore » numerically integrated to estimate the energy required to reach full density for each material. The results suggest that the glassy carbon spheres and the ceramic microspheres would require more energy than the other materials to attain full density.« less

Authors:
; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
899097
Report Number(s):
UCRL-TR-219532
TRN: US0703545
DOE Contract Number:
W-7405-ENG-48
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
58 GEOSCIENCES; 36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; 75 CONDENSED MATTER PHYSICS, SUPERCONDUCTIVITY AND SUPERFLUIDITY; CARBON; CERAMICS; COMPACTING; COPPER; GRANULAR MATERIALS; MICROSPHERES; MOLYBDENUM; POROSITY; SAND; SILICON CARBIDES; TITANIUM

Citation Formats

Carlson, S R, Bonner, B P, Ryerson, F J, and Hart, M M. Compaction of Ceramic Microspheres, Spherical Molybdenum Powder and Other Materials to 3 GPa. United States: N. p., 2006. Web. doi:10.2172/899097.
Carlson, S R, Bonner, B P, Ryerson, F J, & Hart, M M. Compaction of Ceramic Microspheres, Spherical Molybdenum Powder and Other Materials to 3 GPa. United States. doi:10.2172/899097.
Carlson, S R, Bonner, B P, Ryerson, F J, and Hart, M M. Fri . "Compaction of Ceramic Microspheres, Spherical Molybdenum Powder and Other Materials to 3 GPa". United States. doi:10.2172/899097. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/899097.
@article{osti_899097,
title = {Compaction of Ceramic Microspheres, Spherical Molybdenum Powder and Other Materials to 3 GPa},
author = {Carlson, S R and Bonner, B P and Ryerson, F J and Hart, M M},
abstractNote = {Pressure-volume relationships were measured at room temperature for eight granular materials and one specimen of epoxy foam. The granular materials included hollow ceramic microspheres, spherical molybdenum powder, Ottawa sand, aluminum, copper, titanium and silicon carbide powders and glassy carbon spheres. Measurements were made to 0.9 GPa in a liquid medium press for all of the granular materials and to 3 GPa in a solid medium press for the ceramic microspheres and molybdenum powder. A single specimen of epoxy foam was compressed to 30 MPa in the liquid medium press. Bulk moduli were calculated as a function of pressure for the ceramic microspheres, the molybdenum powder and three other granular materials. The energy expended in compacting the granular materials was determined by numerically integrating pressure-volume curves. More energy was expended per unit volume in compacting the molybdenum powder to 1 GPa than for the other materials, but compaction of the ceramic microspheres required more energy per gram due to their very low initial density. The merge pressure, the pressure at which all porosity is removed, was estimated for each material by plotting porosity against pressure on a semi-log plot. The pressure-volume curves were then extrapolated to the predicted merge pressures and numerically integrated to estimate the energy required to reach full density for each material. The results suggest that the glassy carbon spheres and the ceramic microspheres would require more energy than the other materials to attain full density.},
doi = {10.2172/899097},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Jan 27 00:00:00 EST 2006},
month = {Fri Jan 27 00:00:00 EST 2006}
}

Technical Report:

Save / Share: