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Title: Basic Research Needs for Advanced Nuclear Systems. Report of the Basic Energy Sciences Workshop on Basic Research Needs for Advanced Nuclear Energy Systems, July 31-August 3, 2006

Abstract

The global utilization of nuclear energy has come a long way from its humble beginnings in the first sustained nuclear reaction at the University of Chicago in 1942. Today, there are over 440 nuclear reactors in 31 countries producing approximately 16% of the electrical energy used worldwide. In the United States, 104 nuclear reactors currently provide 19% of electrical energy used nationally. The International Atomic Energy Agency projects significant growth in the utilization of nuclear power over the next several decades due to increasing demand for energy and environmental concerns related to emissions from fossil plants. There are 28 new nuclear plants currently under construction including 10 in China, 8 in India, and 4 in Russia. In the United States, there have been notifications to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission of intentions to apply for combined construction and operating licenses for 27 new units over the next decade. The projected growth in nuclear power has focused increasing attention on issues related to the permanent disposal of nuclear waste, the proliferation of nuclear weapons technologies and materials, and the sustainability of a once-through nuclear fuel cycle. In addition, the effective utilization of nuclear power will require continued improvements in nuclear technology, particularlymore » related to safety and efficiency. In all of these areas, the performance of materials and chemical processes under extreme conditions is a limiting factor. The related basic research challenges represent some of the most demanding tests of our fundamental understanding of materials science and chemistry, and they provide significant opportunities for advancing basic science with broad impacts for nuclear reactor materials, fuels, waste forms, and separations techniques. Of particular importance is the role that new nanoscale characterization and computational tools can play in addressing these challenges. These tools, which include DOE synchrotron X-ray sources, neutron sources, nanoscale science research centers, and supercomputers, offer the opportunity to transform and accelerate the fundamental materials and chemical sciences that underpin technology development for advanced nuclear energy systems. The fundamental challenge is to understand and control chemical and physical phenomena in multi-component systems from femto-seconds to millennia, at temperatures to 1000?C, and for radiation doses to hundreds of displacements per atom (dpa). This is a scientific challenge of enormous proportions, with broad implications in the materials science and chemistry of complex systems. New understanding is required for microstructural evolution and phase stability under relevant chemical and physical conditions, chemistry and structural evolution at interfaces, chemical behavior of actinide and fission-product solutions, and nuclear and thermomechanical phenomena in fuels and waste forms. First-principles approaches are needed to describe f-electron systems, design molecules for separations, and explain materials failure mechanisms. Nanoscale synthesis and characterization methods are needed to understand and design materials and interfaces with radiation, temperature, and corrosion resistance. Dynamical measurements are required to understand fundamental physical and chemical phenomena. New multiscale approaches are needed to integrate this knowledge into accurate models of relevant phenomena and complex systems across multiple length and time scales.« less

Authors:
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Publication Date:
Research Org.:
DOESC (USDOE Office of Science (SC))
Sponsoring Org.:
US DOE - Office of Basic Energy Sciences
OSTI Identifier:
899045
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
12 MANAGEMENT OF RADIOACTIVE WASTES, AND NON-RADIOACTIVE WASTES FROM NUCLEAR FACILITIES; 29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY AND ECONOMY; 11 NUCLEAR FUEL CYCLE AND FUEL MATERIALS; 43 PARTICLE ACCELERATORS; 45 MILITARY TECHNOLOGY, WEAPONRY, AND NATIONAL DEFENSE; ACTINIDES; CORROSION RESISTANCE; IAEA; NEUTRON SOURCES; NUCLEAR ENERGY; NUCLEAR FUELS; NUCLEAR POWER; NUCLEAR REACTIONS; NUCLEAR WEAPONS; OPERATING LICENSES; PHASE STABILITY; RADIATION DOSES; RADIOACTIVE WASTES; SUPERCOMPUTERS; SYNCHROTRONS; SYNTHESIS; WASTE FORMS; X-RAY SOURCES

Citation Formats

Roberto, J., Diaz de la Rubia, T., Gibala, R., Zinkle, S., Miller, J.R., Pimblott, S., Burns, C., Raymond, K., Grimes, R., Pasamehmetoglu, K., Clark, S., Ewing, R., Wagner, A., Yip, S., Buchanan, M., Crabtree, G., Hemminger, J., Poate, J., Miller, J.C., Edelstein, N., Fitzsimmons, T., Gruzalski, G., Michaels, G., Morss, L., Peters, M., and Talamini, K. Basic Research Needs for Advanced Nuclear Systems. Report of the Basic Energy Sciences Workshop on Basic Research Needs for Advanced Nuclear Energy Systems, July 31-August 3, 2006. United States: N. p., 2006. Web. doi:10.2172/899045.
Roberto, J., Diaz de la Rubia, T., Gibala, R., Zinkle, S., Miller, J.R., Pimblott, S., Burns, C., Raymond, K., Grimes, R., Pasamehmetoglu, K., Clark, S., Ewing, R., Wagner, A., Yip, S., Buchanan, M., Crabtree, G., Hemminger, J., Poate, J., Miller, J.C., Edelstein, N., Fitzsimmons, T., Gruzalski, G., Michaels, G., Morss, L., Peters, M., & Talamini, K. Basic Research Needs for Advanced Nuclear Systems. Report of the Basic Energy Sciences Workshop on Basic Research Needs for Advanced Nuclear Energy Systems, July 31-August 3, 2006. United States. doi:10.2172/899045.
Roberto, J., Diaz de la Rubia, T., Gibala, R., Zinkle, S., Miller, J.R., Pimblott, S., Burns, C., Raymond, K., Grimes, R., Pasamehmetoglu, K., Clark, S., Ewing, R., Wagner, A., Yip, S., Buchanan, M., Crabtree, G., Hemminger, J., Poate, J., Miller, J.C., Edelstein, N., Fitzsimmons, T., Gruzalski, G., Michaels, G., Morss, L., Peters, M., and Talamini, K. Sun . "Basic Research Needs for Advanced Nuclear Systems. Report of the Basic Energy Sciences Workshop on Basic Research Needs for Advanced Nuclear Energy Systems, July 31-August 3, 2006". United States. doi:10.2172/899045. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/899045.
@article{osti_899045,
title = {Basic Research Needs for Advanced Nuclear Systems. Report of the Basic Energy Sciences Workshop on Basic Research Needs for Advanced Nuclear Energy Systems, July 31-August 3, 2006},
author = {Roberto, J. and Diaz de la Rubia, T. and Gibala, R. and Zinkle, S. and Miller, J.R. and Pimblott, S. and Burns, C. and Raymond, K. and Grimes, R. and Pasamehmetoglu, K. and Clark, S. and Ewing, R. and Wagner, A. and Yip, S. and Buchanan, M. and Crabtree, G. and Hemminger, J. and Poate, J. and Miller, J.C. and Edelstein, N. and Fitzsimmons, T. and Gruzalski, G. and Michaels, G. and Morss, L. and Peters, M. and Talamini, K.},
abstractNote = {The global utilization of nuclear energy has come a long way from its humble beginnings in the first sustained nuclear reaction at the University of Chicago in 1942. Today, there are over 440 nuclear reactors in 31 countries producing approximately 16% of the electrical energy used worldwide. In the United States, 104 nuclear reactors currently provide 19% of electrical energy used nationally. The International Atomic Energy Agency projects significant growth in the utilization of nuclear power over the next several decades due to increasing demand for energy and environmental concerns related to emissions from fossil plants. There are 28 new nuclear plants currently under construction including 10 in China, 8 in India, and 4 in Russia. In the United States, there have been notifications to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission of intentions to apply for combined construction and operating licenses for 27 new units over the next decade. The projected growth in nuclear power has focused increasing attention on issues related to the permanent disposal of nuclear waste, the proliferation of nuclear weapons technologies and materials, and the sustainability of a once-through nuclear fuel cycle. In addition, the effective utilization of nuclear power will require continued improvements in nuclear technology, particularly related to safety and efficiency. In all of these areas, the performance of materials and chemical processes under extreme conditions is a limiting factor. The related basic research challenges represent some of the most demanding tests of our fundamental understanding of materials science and chemistry, and they provide significant opportunities for advancing basic science with broad impacts for nuclear reactor materials, fuels, waste forms, and separations techniques. Of particular importance is the role that new nanoscale characterization and computational tools can play in addressing these challenges. These tools, which include DOE synchrotron X-ray sources, neutron sources, nanoscale science research centers, and supercomputers, offer the opportunity to transform and accelerate the fundamental materials and chemical sciences that underpin technology development for advanced nuclear energy systems. The fundamental challenge is to understand and control chemical and physical phenomena in multi-component systems from femto-seconds to millennia, at temperatures to 1000?C, and for radiation doses to hundreds of displacements per atom (dpa). This is a scientific challenge of enormous proportions, with broad implications in the materials science and chemistry of complex systems. New understanding is required for microstructural evolution and phase stability under relevant chemical and physical conditions, chemistry and structural evolution at interfaces, chemical behavior of actinide and fission-product solutions, and nuclear and thermomechanical phenomena in fuels and waste forms. First-principles approaches are needed to describe f-electron systems, design molecules for separations, and explain materials failure mechanisms. Nanoscale synthesis and characterization methods are needed to understand and design materials and interfaces with radiation, temperature, and corrosion resistance. Dynamical measurements are required to understand fundamental physical and chemical phenomena. New multiscale approaches are needed to integrate this knowledge into accurate models of relevant phenomena and complex systems across multiple length and time scales.},
doi = {10.2172/899045},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2006},
month = {10}
}