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Title: Problems in measuring diffuse X-ray scattering

Abstract

Abstract Problems encountered in making measurements of diffuse X-ray scattering are discussed. These generally arise from the need to measure very weak scattering in the presence of very strong scattering (Bragg peaks) using multi-detectors of various kinds. The problems are not confined to synchrotron experiments but may even occur using a tube source in the home laboratory. Specific details are given of experiments using 80.725 keV X-rays and a mar345 Image Plate detector on the 1-ID beamline of XOR at the Advanced Photon Source. In these a severe ‘blooming’ artefact which occurred around some strong Bragg peaks was traced to fluorescence from a steel mounting plate in the detector when strong Bragg peaks were incident. Algorithms developed to remove these artefacts from the data are described.

Authors:
; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Advanced Photon Source (APS); Australian Nat. Univ.
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
898713
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC02-06CH11357
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Zeitschrift fuer Kristallographie. Crystalline Materials; Journal Volume: 220; Journal Issue: 12
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
37 INORGANIC, ORGANIC, PHYSICAL AND ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY; DIFFUSE SCATTERING; X-RAY DIFFRACTION; MEASURING METHODS; advanced photon source

Citation Formats

Welberry, T. Richard, Goossens, Darren J., Heerdegen, Aidan P., and Lee, Peter L.. Problems in measuring diffuse X-ray scattering. United States: N. p., 2005. Web. doi:10.1524/zkri.2005.220.12.1052.
Welberry, T. Richard, Goossens, Darren J., Heerdegen, Aidan P., & Lee, Peter L.. Problems in measuring diffuse X-ray scattering. United States. doi:10.1524/zkri.2005.220.12.1052.
Welberry, T. Richard, Goossens, Darren J., Heerdegen, Aidan P., and Lee, Peter L.. Sat . "Problems in measuring diffuse X-ray scattering". United States. doi:10.1524/zkri.2005.220.12.1052.
@article{osti_898713,
title = {Problems in measuring diffuse X-ray scattering},
author = {Welberry, T. Richard and Goossens, Darren J. and Heerdegen, Aidan P. and Lee, Peter L.},
abstractNote = {Abstract Problems encountered in making measurements of diffuse X-ray scattering are discussed. These generally arise from the need to measure very weak scattering in the presence of very strong scattering (Bragg peaks) using multi-detectors of various kinds. The problems are not confined to synchrotron experiments but may even occur using a tube source in the home laboratory. Specific details are given of experiments using 80.725 keV X-rays and a mar345 Image Plate detector on the 1-ID beamline of XOR at the Advanced Photon Source. In these a severe ‘blooming’ artefact which occurred around some strong Bragg peaks was traced to fluorescence from a steel mounting plate in the detector when strong Bragg peaks were incident. Algorithms developed to remove these artefacts from the data are described.},
doi = {10.1524/zkri.2005.220.12.1052},
journal = {Zeitschrift fuer Kristallographie. Crystalline Materials},
number = 12,
volume = 220,
place = {United States},
year = {Sat Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2005},
month = {Sat Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2005}
}
  • X-ray diffraction has the potential to provide rich information about the structural dynamics of macromolecules. To realize this potential, both Bragg scattering, which is currently used to derive macromolecular structures, and diffuse scattering, which reports on correlations in charge density variations, must be measured. Until now, measurement of diffuse scattering from protein crystals has been scarce because of the extra effort of collecting diffuse data. Here, we present 3D measurements of diffuse intensity collected from crystals of the enzymes cyclophilin A and trypsin. The measurements were obtained from the same X-ray diffraction images as the Bragg data, using best practicesmore » for standard data collection. To model the underlying dynamics in a practical way that could be used during structure refinement, we tested translation–libration–screw (TLS), liquid-like motions (LLM), and coarse-grained normal-modes (NM) models of protein motions. The LLM model provides a global picture of motions and was refined against the diffuse data, whereas the TLS and NM models provide more detailed and distinct descriptions of atom displacements, and only used information from the Bragg data. Whereas different TLS groupings yielded similar Bragg intensities, they yielded different diffuse intensities, none of which agreed well with the data. In contrast, both the LLM and NM models agreed substantially with the diffuse data. In conclusion, these results demonstrate a realistic path to increase the number of diffuse datasets available to the wider biosciences community and indicate that dynamics-inspired NM structural models can simultaneously agree with both Bragg and diffuse scattering.« less
  • X-ray diffraction has the potential to provide rich information about the structural dynamics of macromolecules. To realize this potential, both Bragg scattering, which is currently used to derive macromolecular structures, and diffuse scattering, which reports on correlations in charge density variations, must be measured. Until now, measurement of diffuse scattering from protein crystals has been scarce because of the extra effort of collecting diffuse data. Here, we present 3D measurements of diffuse intensity collected from crystals of the enzymes cyclophilin A and trypsin. The measurements were obtained from the same X-ray diffraction images as the Bragg data, using best practicesmore » for standard data collection. To model the underlying dynamics in a practical way that could be used during structure refinement, we tested translation–libration–screw (TLS), liquid-like motions (LLM), and coarse-grained normal-modes (NM) models of protein motions. The LLM model provides a global picture of motions and was refined against the diffuse data, whereas the TLS and NM models provide more detailed and distinct descriptions of atom displacements, and only used information from the Bragg data. Whereas different TLS groupings yielded similar Bragg intensities, they yielded different diffuse intensities, none of which agreed well with the data. In contrast, both the LLM and NM models agreed substantially with the diffuse data. Lastly, these results demonstrate a realistic path to increase the number of diffuse datasets available to the wider biosciences community and indicate that dynamics-inspired NM structural models can simultaneously agree with both Bragg and diffuse scattering.« less
  • X-ray diffraction has the potential to provide rich information about the structural dynamics of macromolecules. To realize this potential, both Bragg scattering, which is currently used to derive macromolecular structures, and diffuse scattering, which reports on correlations in charge density variations, must be measured. Until now, measurement of diffuse scattering from protein crystals has been scarce because of the extra effort of collecting diffuse data. Here, we present 3D measurements of diffuse intensity collected from crystals of the enzymes cyclophilin A and trypsin. The measurements were obtained from the same X-ray diffraction images as the Bragg data, using best practicesmore » for standard data collection. To model the underlying dynamics in a practical way that could be used during structure refinement, we tested translation-libration-screw (TLS), liquidlike motions (LLM), and coarse-grained normal-modes (NM) models of protein motions. The LLM model provides a global picture of motions and was refined against the diffuse data, whereas the TLS and NM models provide more detailed and distinct descriptions of atom displacements, and only used information from the Bragg data. Whereas different TLS groupings yielded similar Bragg intensities, they yielded different diffuse intensities, none of which agreed well with the data. In contrast, both the LLM and NM models agreed substantially with the diffuse data. These results demonstrate a realistic path to increase the number of diffuse datasets available to the wider biosciences community and indicate that dynamics-inspired NM structural models can simultaneously agree with both Bragg and diffuse scattering.« less
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