skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: The distribution of subsurface damage in fused silica

Abstract

Managing subsurface damage during the shaping process and removing subsurface damage during the polishing process is essential in the production of low damage density optical components, such as those required for use on high peak power lasers. Removal of subsurface damage, during the polishing process, requires polishing to a depth which is greater than the depth of the residual cracks present following the shaping process. To successfully manage, and ultimately remove subsurface damage, understanding the distribution and character of fractures in the subsurface region introduced during fabrication process is important. We have characterized the depth and morphology of subsurface fractures present following fixed abrasive and loose abrasive grinding processes. At shallow depths lateral cracks and an overlapping series of trailing indentation fractures were found to be present. At greater depths, subsurface damage consists of a series of trailing indentation fractures. The area density of trailing fractures changes as a function of depth, however the length and shape of individual cracks remain nearly constant for a given grinding process. We have developed and applied a model to interpret the depth and crack length distributions of subsurface surface damage in terms of key variables including abrasive size and load.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
898591
Report Number(s):
UCRL-CONF-217443
Journal ID: ISSN 0277-786X; TRN: US200706%%226
DOE Contract Number:  
W-7405-ENG-48
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Journal Volume: 5991; Conference: Presented at: Boulder Damage Symposium, Boulder, CO, United States, Sep 19 - Sep 21, 2005
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
42 ENGINEERING; ABRASIVES; DISTRIBUTION; FABRICATION; FRACTURES; GRINDING; LASERS; MORPHOLOGY; PEAK LOAD; POLISHING; PRODUCTION; REMOVAL; SHAPE; SILICA

Citation Formats

Miller, P E, Suratwala, T I, Wong, L L, Feit, M D, Menapace, J A, Davis, P J, and Steele, R A. The distribution of subsurface damage in fused silica. United States: N. p., 2005. Web. doi:10.1117/12.638821.
Miller, P E, Suratwala, T I, Wong, L L, Feit, M D, Menapace, J A, Davis, P J, & Steele, R A. The distribution of subsurface damage in fused silica. United States. doi:10.1117/12.638821.
Miller, P E, Suratwala, T I, Wong, L L, Feit, M D, Menapace, J A, Davis, P J, and Steele, R A. Mon . "The distribution of subsurface damage in fused silica". United States. doi:10.1117/12.638821. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/898591.
@article{osti_898591,
title = {The distribution of subsurface damage in fused silica},
author = {Miller, P E and Suratwala, T I and Wong, L L and Feit, M D and Menapace, J A and Davis, P J and Steele, R A},
abstractNote = {Managing subsurface damage during the shaping process and removing subsurface damage during the polishing process is essential in the production of low damage density optical components, such as those required for use on high peak power lasers. Removal of subsurface damage, during the polishing process, requires polishing to a depth which is greater than the depth of the residual cracks present following the shaping process. To successfully manage, and ultimately remove subsurface damage, understanding the distribution and character of fractures in the subsurface region introduced during fabrication process is important. We have characterized the depth and morphology of subsurface fractures present following fixed abrasive and loose abrasive grinding processes. At shallow depths lateral cracks and an overlapping series of trailing indentation fractures were found to be present. At greater depths, subsurface damage consists of a series of trailing indentation fractures. The area density of trailing fractures changes as a function of depth, however the length and shape of individual cracks remain nearly constant for a given grinding process. We have developed and applied a model to interpret the depth and crack length distributions of subsurface surface damage in terms of key variables including abrasive size and load.},
doi = {10.1117/12.638821},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = 5991,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Nov 21 00:00:00 EST 2005},
month = {Mon Nov 21 00:00:00 EST 2005}
}

Conference:
Other availability
Please see Document Availability for additional information on obtaining the full-text document. Library patrons may search WorldCat to identify libraries that hold this conference proceeding.

Save / Share: