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Title: FY05 LDRD Final Report Molecular Engineering of Electrodialysis Membranes 03-ERD-060

Abstract

Using a combination of modeling and experimental work we have developed a new method for purifying water that uses less energy than conventional methods and that can be made selective for removing targeted contaminants. The method uses nanoporous membranes that are permselective for anion or cation transfer. Ion selectivity results from double layer overlap inside the pores such that they dominantly contain ions opposite in charge to the surface charge of the membrane. Membrane charge can be adjusted through functionalization. Experiments confirm membrane permselectivity and overall energy use less than that for conventional electrodialysis. The nanoporous membranes are used in a conventional electrodialysis configuration and can be incorporated in existing electrodialysis systems without modification. The technology merits further development and testing in real systems, and could result in a significant reduction in water treatment costs.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
898481
Report Number(s):
UCRL-TR-219452
TRN: US200708%%113
DOE Contract Number:
W-7405-ENG-48
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
37 INORGANIC, ORGANIC, PHYSICAL AND ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY; 42 ENGINEERING; 54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; ANIONS; CATIONS; CONFIGURATION; ELECTRODIALYSIS; MEMBRANES; SIMULATION; TESTING; WATER; WATER TREATMENT

Citation Formats

Bourcier, W, O'Brien, K, Sawvel, A, Johnson, M, Bettencourt, K, Letant, S, Felter, T, Langry, K, Wilson, B, Haslam, J, Schaldach, C, and Sopchak, D. FY05 LDRD Final Report Molecular Engineering of Electrodialysis Membranes 03-ERD-060. United States: N. p., 2006. Web. doi:10.2172/898481.
Bourcier, W, O'Brien, K, Sawvel, A, Johnson, M, Bettencourt, K, Letant, S, Felter, T, Langry, K, Wilson, B, Haslam, J, Schaldach, C, & Sopchak, D. FY05 LDRD Final Report Molecular Engineering of Electrodialysis Membranes 03-ERD-060. United States. doi:10.2172/898481.
Bourcier, W, O'Brien, K, Sawvel, A, Johnson, M, Bettencourt, K, Letant, S, Felter, T, Langry, K, Wilson, B, Haslam, J, Schaldach, C, and Sopchak, D. Wed . "FY05 LDRD Final Report Molecular Engineering of Electrodialysis Membranes 03-ERD-060". United States. doi:10.2172/898481. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/898481.
@article{osti_898481,
title = {FY05 LDRD Final Report Molecular Engineering of Electrodialysis Membranes 03-ERD-060},
author = {Bourcier, W and O'Brien, K and Sawvel, A and Johnson, M and Bettencourt, K and Letant, S and Felter, T and Langry, K and Wilson, B and Haslam, J and Schaldach, C and Sopchak, D},
abstractNote = {Using a combination of modeling and experimental work we have developed a new method for purifying water that uses less energy than conventional methods and that can be made selective for removing targeted contaminants. The method uses nanoporous membranes that are permselective for anion or cation transfer. Ion selectivity results from double layer overlap inside the pores such that they dominantly contain ions opposite in charge to the surface charge of the membrane. Membrane charge can be adjusted through functionalization. Experiments confirm membrane permselectivity and overall energy use less than that for conventional electrodialysis. The nanoporous membranes are used in a conventional electrodialysis configuration and can be incorporated in existing electrodialysis systems without modification. The technology merits further development and testing in real systems, and could result in a significant reduction in water treatment costs.},
doi = {10.2172/898481},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Feb 22 00:00:00 EST 2006},
month = {Wed Feb 22 00:00:00 EST 2006}
}

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