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Title: Simulation and Comparison of Various Gamma-Ray Imaging Detector Configurations for IPRL Devices

Abstract

Simulations are performed for seven different geometrical configurations of CdZnTe (CZT) detector arrays for Intelligent Personal Radiation Locator (IPRL) devices. IPRL devices are portable radiation detectors that have gamma-ray imaging capability. The detector performance is analyzed for each type of IPRL configuration, and the intrinsic photopeak efficiency, intrinsic photopeak count rate, detector image resolution, imaging efficiency, and imaging count rate are determined.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
898431
Report Number(s):
UCRL-TR-226999
TRN: US0701907
DOE Contract Number:
W-7405-ENG-48
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
46 INSTRUMENTATION RELATED TO NUCLEAR SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY; 71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; CONFIGURATION; EFFICIENCY; PERFORMANCE; RADIATION DETECTORS; RADIATIONS; RESOLUTION; SIMULATION

Citation Formats

Manini, H A. Simulation and Comparison of Various Gamma-Ray Imaging Detector Configurations for IPRL Devices. United States: N. p., 2006. Web. doi:10.2172/898431.
Manini, H A. Simulation and Comparison of Various Gamma-Ray Imaging Detector Configurations for IPRL Devices. United States. doi:10.2172/898431.
Manini, H A. Wed . "Simulation and Comparison of Various Gamma-Ray Imaging Detector Configurations for IPRL Devices". United States. doi:10.2172/898431. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/898431.
@article{osti_898431,
title = {Simulation and Comparison of Various Gamma-Ray Imaging Detector Configurations for IPRL Devices},
author = {Manini, H A},
abstractNote = {Simulations are performed for seven different geometrical configurations of CdZnTe (CZT) detector arrays for Intelligent Personal Radiation Locator (IPRL) devices. IPRL devices are portable radiation detectors that have gamma-ray imaging capability. The detector performance is analyzed for each type of IPRL configuration, and the intrinsic photopeak efficiency, intrinsic photopeak count rate, detector image resolution, imaging efficiency, and imaging count rate are determined.},
doi = {10.2172/898431},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Dec 27 00:00:00 EST 2006},
month = {Wed Dec 27 00:00:00 EST 2006}
}

Technical Report:

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