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Title: Electronics from Nano-Cell Crystals

Abstract

This report documents the progress during the past year of a project to uncover the fundamental charge transport mechanisms in organic materials, concentration on crystalline systems and in device configurations. The project has produced solid results in molecular synthesis, crystal growth, electrical and optical characterization. The team has reached out and is collaborating with external groups, and therefore leverages well the DOE funds. Of particular note is the discovery of a method to systematically dope rubrene in a field-effect-transistor device configuration. Previous work in conducting polymers demonstrated orders of magnitude enhancement of conductivity, but in conjunction with changing mobility. For active devices (such as FETs) operation, the mobility must be independent of carrier concentration. We have shown for the first time in an organic system, that the carrier concentration can be changed independently of the FET mobility. Thus we have achieved a similar level of carrier concentration control as is routinely found in inorganic semiconductors. This result will enable the field of organics to procede faster towards high performance devices for logic and photovoltaic functionality.

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Columbia University
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC)
OSTI Identifier:
898350
Report Number(s):
DOE/ER/6118-07
DOE Contract Number:
FG02-04ER46118
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; 37 INORGANIC, ORGANIC, PHYSICAL AND ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY; 01 COAL, LIGNITE, AND PEAT; organics, semiconductors, mobility, rubrene, pentacene, photoluminescence, density of states

Citation Formats

Arthur P. Ramirez, and Colin Nuckolls. Electronics from Nano-Cell Crystals. United States: N. p., 2007. Web.
Arthur P. Ramirez, & Colin Nuckolls. Electronics from Nano-Cell Crystals. United States.
Arthur P. Ramirez, and Colin Nuckolls. Tue . "Electronics from Nano-Cell Crystals". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_898350,
title = {Electronics from Nano-Cell Crystals},
author = {Arthur P. Ramirez and Colin Nuckolls},
abstractNote = {This report documents the progress during the past year of a project to uncover the fundamental charge transport mechanisms in organic materials, concentration on crystalline systems and in device configurations. The project has produced solid results in molecular synthesis, crystal growth, electrical and optical characterization. The team has reached out and is collaborating with external groups, and therefore leverages well the DOE funds. Of particular note is the discovery of a method to systematically dope rubrene in a field-effect-transistor device configuration. Previous work in conducting polymers demonstrated orders of magnitude enhancement of conductivity, but in conjunction with changing mobility. For active devices (such as FETs) operation, the mobility must be independent of carrier concentration. We have shown for the first time in an organic system, that the carrier concentration can be changed independently of the FET mobility. Thus we have achieved a similar level of carrier concentration control as is routinely found in inorganic semiconductors. This result will enable the field of organics to procede faster towards high performance devices for logic and photovoltaic functionality.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Jan 30 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Tue Jan 30 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}

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