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Title: Mechanisms controlling soil carbon turnover and their potential application for enhancing carbon sequestration

Abstract

Two major mechanisms, (bio)chemical alteration and physicochemical protection, stabilize soil organic carbon (SOC) and thereby control soil carbon turnover. With (bio)chemical alteration, SOC is transformed by biotic and abiotic processes to chemical forms that are more resistant to decomposition and, in some cases, more easily retained by sorption to soil solids. With physicochemical protection, biochemical attack of SOC is inhibited by organomineral interactions at molecular to millimeter scales. Stabilization of otherwise decomposable SOM can occur via sorption to soil surfaces, complexation with soil minerals, occlusion within aggregates, and deposition in pores inaccessible to decomposers and extracellular enzymes. Soil structure (i.e., the arrangement of solids and pores in the soil) is a master integrating variable that both controls and indicates the SOC stabilization status of a soil. To enhance SOC sequestration, the best option is to modify the soil physicochemical environment to favor the activities of fungi. Specific practices that accomplish this include minimizing tillage, maintaining a near-neutral soil pH and an adequate base cation exchange capacity (particularly Ca), ensuring adequate drainage, and minimizing erosion by water and wind. In some soils, amendments with various high-specific-surface micro- and mesoporous sorbents such as fly ash or charcoal can be beneficial.

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (US), Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
898088
Report Number(s):
PNNL-SA-47084
2131a; 4293; 4298; 4294; KP1208000; TRN: US200705%%447
DOE Contract Number:  
AC05-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Climatic Change, 80(1-2):5-23
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; CARBON; CARBON SEQUESTRATION; CATIONS; CHARCOAL; DEPOSITION; DRAINAGE; ENZYMES; FLY ASH; FUNGI; ION EXCHANGE; SOILS; SORPTION; STABILIZATION; WATER; soil organic carbon; carbon sequestration; global warming; soil organic matter; fungi; bacteria; charcoal; fly ash; Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory

Citation Formats

Jastrow, Julie D., Amonette, James E., and Bailey, Vanessa L. Mechanisms controlling soil carbon turnover and their potential application for enhancing carbon sequestration. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1007/s10584-006-9178-3.
Jastrow, Julie D., Amonette, James E., & Bailey, Vanessa L. Mechanisms controlling soil carbon turnover and their potential application for enhancing carbon sequestration. United States. doi:10.1007/s10584-006-9178-3.
Jastrow, Julie D., Amonette, James E., and Bailey, Vanessa L. Mon . "Mechanisms controlling soil carbon turnover and their potential application for enhancing carbon sequestration". United States. doi:10.1007/s10584-006-9178-3.
@article{osti_898088,
title = {Mechanisms controlling soil carbon turnover and their potential application for enhancing carbon sequestration},
author = {Jastrow, Julie D. and Amonette, James E. and Bailey, Vanessa L.},
abstractNote = {Two major mechanisms, (bio)chemical alteration and physicochemical protection, stabilize soil organic carbon (SOC) and thereby control soil carbon turnover. With (bio)chemical alteration, SOC is transformed by biotic and abiotic processes to chemical forms that are more resistant to decomposition and, in some cases, more easily retained by sorption to soil solids. With physicochemical protection, biochemical attack of SOC is inhibited by organomineral interactions at molecular to millimeter scales. Stabilization of otherwise decomposable SOM can occur via sorption to soil surfaces, complexation with soil minerals, occlusion within aggregates, and deposition in pores inaccessible to decomposers and extracellular enzymes. Soil structure (i.e., the arrangement of solids and pores in the soil) is a master integrating variable that both controls and indicates the SOC stabilization status of a soil. To enhance SOC sequestration, the best option is to modify the soil physicochemical environment to favor the activities of fungi. Specific practices that accomplish this include minimizing tillage, maintaining a near-neutral soil pH and an adequate base cation exchange capacity (particularly Ca), ensuring adequate drainage, and minimizing erosion by water and wind. In some soils, amendments with various high-specific-surface micro- and mesoporous sorbents such as fly ash or charcoal can be beneficial.},
doi = {10.1007/s10584-006-9178-3},
journal = {Climatic Change, 80(1-2):5-23},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}