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Title: Mutations that Cause Human Disease: A Computational/Experimental Approach

Abstract

International genome sequencing projects have produced billions of nucleotides (letters) of DNA sequence data, including the complete genome sequences of 74 organisms. These genome sequences have created many new scientific opportunities, including the ability to identify sequence variations among individuals within a species. These genetic differences, which are known as single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), are particularly important in understanding the genetic basis for disease susceptibility. Since the report of the complete human genome sequence, over two million human SNPs have been identified, including a large-scale comparison of an entire chromosome from twenty individuals. Of the protein coding SNPs (cSNPs), approximately half leads to a single amino acid change in the encoded protein (non-synonymous coding SNPs). Most of these changes are functionally silent, while the remainder negatively impact the protein and sometimes cause human disease. To date, over 550 SNPs have been found to cause single locus (monogenic) diseases and many others have been associated with polygenic diseases. SNPs have been linked to specific human diseases, including late-onset Parkinson disease, autism, rheumatoid arthritis and cancer. The ability to predict accurately the effects of these SNPs on protein function would represent a major advance toward understanding these diseases. To date several attemptsmore » have been made toward predicting the effects of such mutations. The most successful of these is a computational approach called ''Sorting Intolerant From Tolerant'' (SIFT). This method uses sequence conservation among many similar proteins to predict which residues in a protein are functionally important. However, this method suffers from several limitations. First, a query sequence must have a sufficient number of relatives to infer sequence conservation. Second, this method does not make use of or provide any information on protein structure, which can be used to understand how an amino acid change affects the protein. The experimental methods that provide the most detailed structural information on proteins are X-ray crystallography and NMR spectroscopy. However, these methods are labor intensive and currently cannot be carried out on a genomic scale. Nonetheless, Structural Genomics projects are being pursued by more than a dozen groups and consortia worldwide and as a result the number of experimentally determined structures is rising exponentially. Based on the expectation that protein structures will continue to be determined at an ever-increasing rate, reliable structure prediction schemes will become increasingly valuable, leading to information on protein function and disease for many different proteins. Given known genetic variability and experimentally determined protein structures, can we accurately predict the effects of single amino acid substitutions? An objective assessment of this question would involve comparing predicted and experimentally determined structures, which thus far has not been rigorously performed. The completed research leveraged existing expertise at LLNL in computational and structural biology, as well as significant computing resources, to address this question.« less

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
898012
Report Number(s):
UCRL-TR-218296
TRN: US200705%%522
DOE Contract Number:  
W-7405-ENG-48
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; AMINO ACIDS; BIOLOGY; CHROMOSOMES; CRYSTALLOGRAPHY; DISEASES; DNA; FORECASTING; GENETIC VARIABILITY; GENETICS; MUTATIONS; NEOPLASMS; NUCLEOTIDES; PROTEIN STRUCTURE; PROTEINS; RESIDUES; RHEUMATIC DISEASES; SORTING; SPECTROSCOPY

Citation Formats

Beernink, P, Barsky, D, and Pesavento, B. Mutations that Cause Human Disease: A Computational/Experimental Approach. United States: N. p., 2006. Web. doi:10.2172/898012.
Beernink, P, Barsky, D, & Pesavento, B. Mutations that Cause Human Disease: A Computational/Experimental Approach. United States. doi:10.2172/898012.
Beernink, P, Barsky, D, and Pesavento, B. Wed . "Mutations that Cause Human Disease: A Computational/Experimental Approach". United States. doi:10.2172/898012. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/898012.
@article{osti_898012,
title = {Mutations that Cause Human Disease: A Computational/Experimental Approach},
author = {Beernink, P and Barsky, D and Pesavento, B},
abstractNote = {International genome sequencing projects have produced billions of nucleotides (letters) of DNA sequence data, including the complete genome sequences of 74 organisms. These genome sequences have created many new scientific opportunities, including the ability to identify sequence variations among individuals within a species. These genetic differences, which are known as single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), are particularly important in understanding the genetic basis for disease susceptibility. Since the report of the complete human genome sequence, over two million human SNPs have been identified, including a large-scale comparison of an entire chromosome from twenty individuals. Of the protein coding SNPs (cSNPs), approximately half leads to a single amino acid change in the encoded protein (non-synonymous coding SNPs). Most of these changes are functionally silent, while the remainder negatively impact the protein and sometimes cause human disease. To date, over 550 SNPs have been found to cause single locus (monogenic) diseases and many others have been associated with polygenic diseases. SNPs have been linked to specific human diseases, including late-onset Parkinson disease, autism, rheumatoid arthritis and cancer. The ability to predict accurately the effects of these SNPs on protein function would represent a major advance toward understanding these diseases. To date several attempts have been made toward predicting the effects of such mutations. The most successful of these is a computational approach called ''Sorting Intolerant From Tolerant'' (SIFT). This method uses sequence conservation among many similar proteins to predict which residues in a protein are functionally important. However, this method suffers from several limitations. First, a query sequence must have a sufficient number of relatives to infer sequence conservation. Second, this method does not make use of or provide any information on protein structure, which can be used to understand how an amino acid change affects the protein. The experimental methods that provide the most detailed structural information on proteins are X-ray crystallography and NMR spectroscopy. However, these methods are labor intensive and currently cannot be carried out on a genomic scale. Nonetheless, Structural Genomics projects are being pursued by more than a dozen groups and consortia worldwide and as a result the number of experimentally determined structures is rising exponentially. Based on the expectation that protein structures will continue to be determined at an ever-increasing rate, reliable structure prediction schemes will become increasingly valuable, leading to information on protein function and disease for many different proteins. Given known genetic variability and experimentally determined protein structures, can we accurately predict the effects of single amino acid substitutions? An objective assessment of this question would involve comparing predicted and experimentally determined structures, which thus far has not been rigorously performed. The completed research leveraged existing expertise at LLNL in computational and structural biology, as well as significant computing resources, to address this question.},
doi = {10.2172/898012},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Jan 11 00:00:00 EST 2006},
month = {Wed Jan 11 00:00:00 EST 2006}
}

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