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Title: Identification of clustered YY1 binding sites in Imprinting Control Regions

Abstract

Mammalian genomic imprinting is regulated by Imprinting Control Regions (ICRs) that are usually associated with tandem arrays of transcription factor binding sites. In the current study, the sequence features derived from a tandem array of YY1 binding sites of Peg3-DMR (differentially methylated region) led us to identify three additional clustered YY1 binding sites, which are also localized within the DMRs of Xist, Tsix, and Nespas. These regions have been shown to play a critical role as ICRs for the regulation of surrounding genes. These ICRs have maintained a tandem array of YY1 binding sites during mammalian evolution. The in vivo binding of YY1 to these regions is allele-specific and only to the unmethylated active alleles. Promoter/enhancer assays suggest that a tandem array of YY1 binding sites function as a potential orientation-dependent enhancer. Insulator assays revealed that the enhancer-blocking activity is detected only in the YY1 binding sites of Peg3-DMR but not in the YY1 binding sites of other DMRs. Overall, our identification of three additional clustered YY1 binding sites in imprinted domains suggests a significant role for YY1 in mammalian genomic imprinting.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
897965
Report Number(s):
UCRL-JRNL-220689
TRN: US200706%%157
DOE Contract Number:
W-7405-ENG-48
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Genome Research, vol. 16, no. 7, July 1, 2006, pp. 901-911
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; GENES; IN VIVO; REGULATIONS; TRANSCRIPTION FACTORS

Citation Formats

Kim, J D, Hinz, A, Bergmann, A, Huang, J, Ovcharenko, I, Stubbs, L, and Kim, J. Identification of clustered YY1 binding sites in Imprinting Control Regions. United States: N. p., 2006. Web.
Kim, J D, Hinz, A, Bergmann, A, Huang, J, Ovcharenko, I, Stubbs, L, & Kim, J. Identification of clustered YY1 binding sites in Imprinting Control Regions. United States.
Kim, J D, Hinz, A, Bergmann, A, Huang, J, Ovcharenko, I, Stubbs, L, and Kim, J. Wed . "Identification of clustered YY1 binding sites in Imprinting Control Regions". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/897965.
@article{osti_897965,
title = {Identification of clustered YY1 binding sites in Imprinting Control Regions},
author = {Kim, J D and Hinz, A and Bergmann, A and Huang, J and Ovcharenko, I and Stubbs, L and Kim, J},
abstractNote = {Mammalian genomic imprinting is regulated by Imprinting Control Regions (ICRs) that are usually associated with tandem arrays of transcription factor binding sites. In the current study, the sequence features derived from a tandem array of YY1 binding sites of Peg3-DMR (differentially methylated region) led us to identify three additional clustered YY1 binding sites, which are also localized within the DMRs of Xist, Tsix, and Nespas. These regions have been shown to play a critical role as ICRs for the regulation of surrounding genes. These ICRs have maintained a tandem array of YY1 binding sites during mammalian evolution. The in vivo binding of YY1 to these regions is allele-specific and only to the unmethylated active alleles. Promoter/enhancer assays suggest that a tandem array of YY1 binding sites function as a potential orientation-dependent enhancer. Insulator assays revealed that the enhancer-blocking activity is detected only in the YY1 binding sites of Peg3-DMR but not in the YY1 binding sites of other DMRs. Overall, our identification of three additional clustered YY1 binding sites in imprinted domains suggests a significant role for YY1 in mammalian genomic imprinting.},
doi = {},
journal = {Genome Research, vol. 16, no. 7, July 1, 2006, pp. 901-911},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Apr 19 00:00:00 EDT 2006},
month = {Wed Apr 19 00:00:00 EDT 2006}
}
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