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Title: Comet 81P/Wild 2 Under a Microscope

Abstract

No abstract prepared.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; more »; ; « less
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
897746
Report Number(s):
SLAC-REPRINT-2006-197
TRN: US200705%%237
DOE Contract Number:
AC02-76SF00515
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Science 314:1711-1716,2006
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; COMETS; MICROSCOPY; MORPHOLOGY; Other,OTHER

Citation Formats

Brownlee, D., Tsou, P., Aleon, J., Alexander, C.M.O., Araki, T., Bajt, S., Baratta, G.A., Bastien, R., Bland, P., Bleuet, P., Borg, J., Bradley, J.P., Brearley, A., Brenker, F., Brennan, S., Bridges, J.C., Browning, N.D., Brucato, J.R., Bullock, E., Burchell, M.J., Busemann, H., and /Washington U., Seattle /Caltech, JPL /CSNSM, Orsay /Carnegie Inst., Wash., D.C. /North Carolina U. /LLNL, Livermore /Catania Astrophys. Observ. /NASA, Houston /Natl. Hist. Museum, London /Imperial Coll., London /ESRF, Grenoble /New Mexico U. /Frankfurt U. /SLAC /Open U. /UC, Davis /Capodimonte Observ. /Smithsonian Inst. /Kent U. Comet 81P/Wild 2 Under a Microscope. United States: N. p., 2007. Web.
Brownlee, D., Tsou, P., Aleon, J., Alexander, C.M.O., Araki, T., Bajt, S., Baratta, G.A., Bastien, R., Bland, P., Bleuet, P., Borg, J., Bradley, J.P., Brearley, A., Brenker, F., Brennan, S., Bridges, J.C., Browning, N.D., Brucato, J.R., Bullock, E., Burchell, M.J., Busemann, H., & /Washington U., Seattle /Caltech, JPL /CSNSM, Orsay /Carnegie Inst., Wash., D.C. /North Carolina U. /LLNL, Livermore /Catania Astrophys. Observ. /NASA, Houston /Natl. Hist. Museum, London /Imperial Coll., London /ESRF, Grenoble /New Mexico U. /Frankfurt U. /SLAC /Open U. /UC, Davis /Capodimonte Observ. /Smithsonian Inst. /Kent U. Comet 81P/Wild 2 Under a Microscope. United States.
Brownlee, D., Tsou, P., Aleon, J., Alexander, C.M.O., Araki, T., Bajt, S., Baratta, G.A., Bastien, R., Bland, P., Bleuet, P., Borg, J., Bradley, J.P., Brearley, A., Brenker, F., Brennan, S., Bridges, J.C., Browning, N.D., Brucato, J.R., Bullock, E., Burchell, M.J., Busemann, H., and /Washington U., Seattle /Caltech, JPL /CSNSM, Orsay /Carnegie Inst., Wash., D.C. /North Carolina U. /LLNL, Livermore /Catania Astrophys. Observ. /NASA, Houston /Natl. Hist. Museum, London /Imperial Coll., London /ESRF, Grenoble /New Mexico U. /Frankfurt U. /SLAC /Open U. /UC, Davis /Capodimonte Observ. /Smithsonian Inst. /Kent U. Tue . "Comet 81P/Wild 2 Under a Microscope". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_897746,
title = {Comet 81P/Wild 2 Under a Microscope},
author = {Brownlee, D. and Tsou, P. and Aleon, J. and Alexander, C.M.O. and Araki, T. and Bajt, S. and Baratta, G.A. and Bastien, R. and Bland, P. and Bleuet, P. and Borg, J. and Bradley, J.P. and Brearley, A. and Brenker, F. and Brennan, S. and Bridges, J.C. and Browning, N.D. and Brucato, J.R. and Bullock, E. and Burchell, M.J. and Busemann, H. and /Washington U., Seattle /Caltech, JPL /CSNSM, Orsay /Carnegie Inst., Wash., D.C. /North Carolina U. /LLNL, Livermore /Catania Astrophys. Observ. /NASA, Houston /Natl. Hist. Museum, London /Imperial Coll., London /ESRF, Grenoble /New Mexico U. /Frankfurt U. /SLAC /Open U. /UC, Davis /Capodimonte Observ. /Smithsonian Inst. /Kent U.},
abstractNote = {No abstract prepared.},
doi = {},
journal = {Science 314:1711-1716,2006},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Jan 16 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Tue Jan 16 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}
  • The Stardust spacecraft collected thousands of particles from comet 81P/Wild 2 and returned them to Earth for laboratory study. The preliminary examination of these samples shows that the nonvolatile portion of the comet is an unequilibrated assortment of materials that have both presolar and solar system origin. The comet contains an abundance of silicate grains that are much larger than predictions of interstellar grain models, and many of these are high-temperature minerals that appear to have formed in the inner regions of the solar nebula. Their presence in a comet proves that the formation of the solar system included mixingmore » on the grandest scales. Stardust was the first mission to return solid samples from a specific astronomical body other than the Moon. The mission, part of the NASA Discovery program, retrieved samples from a comet that is believed to have formed at the outer fringe of the solar nebula, just beyond the most distant planet. The samples, isolated from the planetary region of the solar system for billions of years, provide new insight into the formation of the solar system. The samples provide unprecedented opportunities both to corroborate astronomical (remote sensing) and sample analysis information (ground truth) on a known primitive solar system body and to compare preserved building blocks from the edge of the planetary system with sample-derived and astronomical data for asteroids, small bodies that formed more than an order of magnitude closer to the Sun. The asteroids, parents of most meteorites, formed by accretion of solids in warmer, denser, more collisionally evolved inner regions of the solar nebula where violent nebular events were capable of flash-melting millimeter-sized rocks, whereas comets formed in the coldest, least dense region. The samples collected by Stardust are the first primitive materials from a known body, and as such they provide contextual insight for all primitive meteoritic samples. About 200 investigators around the world participated in the preliminary analysis of the returned samples, and the papers in this issue summarize their findings.« less
  • No abstract prepared.
  • No abstract prepared.