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Title: Development and Verification of a Fully Coupled Simulator for Offshore Wind Turbines: Preprint

Abstract

This report outlines the development of an analysis tool capable of analyzing a variety of wind turbine, support platform, and mooring system configurations.The simulation capability was tested by model-to-model comparisons to ensure its correctness.

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
897722
Report Number(s):
NREL/CP-500-40979
TRN: US200705%%305
DOE Contract Number:
AC36-99-GO10337
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Related Information: To be presented at the 45th AIAA Aerospace Sciences Meeting and Exhibit, Wind Energy Symposium, 8-11 January 2007, Reno, Nevada
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
17 WIND ENERGY; MOORINGS; SIMULATION; SIMULATORS; VERIFICATION; WIND TURBINES; WIND POWER; WIND ENERGY; OFFSHORE WIND TURBINES; SIMULATION TOOLS; COMPUTER MODELING TOOLS; Wind Energy

Citation Formats

Jonkman, J. M., and Buhl, M. L. Jr.. Development and Verification of a Fully Coupled Simulator for Offshore Wind Turbines: Preprint. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.2514/6.2007-212.
Jonkman, J. M., & Buhl, M. L. Jr.. Development and Verification of a Fully Coupled Simulator for Offshore Wind Turbines: Preprint. United States. doi:10.2514/6.2007-212.
Jonkman, J. M., and Buhl, M. L. Jr.. Mon . "Development and Verification of a Fully Coupled Simulator for Offshore Wind Turbines: Preprint". United States. doi:10.2514/6.2007-212. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/897722.
@article{osti_897722,
title = {Development and Verification of a Fully Coupled Simulator for Offshore Wind Turbines: Preprint},
author = {Jonkman, J. M. and Buhl, M. L. Jr.},
abstractNote = {This report outlines the development of an analysis tool capable of analyzing a variety of wind turbine, support platform, and mooring system configurations.The simulation capability was tested by model-to-model comparisons to ensure its correctness.},
doi = {10.2514/6.2007-212},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}

Conference:
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  • Aeroelastic simulation tools are routinely used to design and analyze onshore wind turbines, in order to obtain cost effective machines that achieve favorable performance while maintaining structural integrity. These tools employ sophisticated models of wind-inflow; aerodynamic, gravitational, and inertial loading of the rotor, nacelle, and tower; elastic effects within and between components; and mechanical actuation and electrical responses of the generator and of control and protection systems. For offshore wind turbines, additional models of the hydrodynamic loading in regular and irregular seas, the dynamic coupling between the support platform motions and wind turbine motions, and the dynamic characterization of mooringmore » systems for compliant floating platforms are also important. Hydrodynamic loading includes contributions from hydrostatics, wave radiation, and wave scattering, including free surface memory effects. The integration of all of these models into comprehensive simulation tools, capable of modeling the fully coupled aeroelastic and hydrodynamic responses of floating offshore wind turbines, is presented.« less
  • Coupled dynamic analysis has an important role in the design of offshore wind turbines because the systems are subject to complex operating conditions from the combined action of waves and wind. The aero-hydro-servo-elastic tool FAST v8 is framed in a novel modularization scheme that facilitates such analysis. Here, we present the verification of new capabilities of FAST v8 to model fixed-bottom offshore wind turbines. We analyze a series of load cases with both wind and wave loads and compare the results against those from the previous international code comparison projects-the International Energy Agency (IEA) Wind Task 23 Subtask 2 Offshoremore » Code Comparison Collaboration (OC3) and the IEA Wind Task 30 OC3 Continued (OC4) projects. The verification is performed using the NREL 5-MW reference turbine supported by monopile, tripod, and jacket substructures. The substructure structural-dynamics models are built within the new SubDyn module of FAST v8, which uses a linear finite-element beam model with Craig-Bampton dynamic system reduction. This allows the modal properties of the substructure to be synthesized and coupled to hydrodynamic loads and tower dynamics. The hydrodynamic loads are calculated using a new strip theory approach for multimember substructures in the updated HydroDyn module of FAST v8. These modules are linked to the rest of FAST through the new coupling scheme involving mapping between module-independent spatial discretizations and a numerically rigorous implicit solver. The results show that the new structural dynamics, hydrodynamics, and coupled solutions compare well to the results from the previous code comparison projects.« less
  • This paper presents the use of fully coupled aero-hydro-servo-elastic simulation tools to perform a loads analysis of a 5-MW offshore wind turbine supported by a barge with moorings, one of many promising floating platform concepts.
  • The design and analysis methods for offshore wind turbines must consider the aerodynamic and hydrodynamic loads and response of the entire system (turbine, tower, substructure, and foundation) coupled to the turbine control system dynamics. Whereas a fully coupled (turbine and support structure) modeling approach is more rigorous, intellectual property concerns can preclude this approach. In fact, turbine control system algorithms and turbine properties are strictly guarded and often not shared. In many cases, a partially coupled analysis using separate tools and an exchange of reduced sets of data via sequential coupling may be necessary. In the sequentially coupled approach, themore » turbine and substructure designers will independently determine and exchange an abridged model of their respective subsystems to be used in their partners' dynamic simulations. Although the ability to achieve design optimization is sacrificed to some degree with a sequentially coupled analysis method, the central question here is whether this approach can deliver the required safety and how the differences in the results from the fully coupled method could affect the design. This work summarizes the scope and preliminary results of a study conducted for the Bureau of Safety and Environmental Enforcement aimed at quantifying differences between these approaches through aero-hydro-servo-elastic simulations of two offshore wind turbines on a monopile and jacket substructure.« less
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