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Title: The Carrington event: Possible doses to crews in space from a comparable event

Abstract

Recent ice core analyses suggest that the Carrington event of 1859 may have been the largest solar energetic particle event in the past several hundred years. Previous analyses of potential doses to humans and electronics from such an event suggested that a Carrington- like event, with a hard spectrum similar to that of the event of September 1989 could be catastrophic. Subsequent analyses of the 10Be concentration in the ice core data suggest that the spectral hardness of the Carrington event was softer and similar to the August 1972 event. In this work we review the earlier estimates of doses from a Carrington event, and present updated dose estimates for deep space crews and electronics using the Carrington event proton fluence P30 MeV in combination with an event spectrum similar to that of the August 1972 event. Potential ramifications of these doses for humans and electronics on deep space missions are discussed.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
897689
Report Number(s):
PNNL-SA-53009
NN200W040; TRN: US0701501
DOE Contract Number:
AC05-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Advances in Space Research, 38(2):226-231
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
72 PHYSICS OF ELEMENTARY PARTICLES AND FIELDS; HARDNESS; PROTONS; SOLAR FLARES; Solar energetic particle event; Space radiation; Total ionizing doses; Carrington Flare; Space radiation risks

Citation Formats

Townsend, L. W., Stephens, Daniel L., Hoff, J. L., Zapp, E. N., Moussa, H. M., Miller, T. M., Campbell, C. E., and Nichols, T. F. The Carrington event: Possible doses to crews in space from a comparable event. United States: N. p., 2006. Web. doi:10.1016/j.asr.2005.01.111.
Townsend, L. W., Stephens, Daniel L., Hoff, J. L., Zapp, E. N., Moussa, H. M., Miller, T. M., Campbell, C. E., & Nichols, T. F. The Carrington event: Possible doses to crews in space from a comparable event. United States. doi:10.1016/j.asr.2005.01.111.
Townsend, L. W., Stephens, Daniel L., Hoff, J. L., Zapp, E. N., Moussa, H. M., Miller, T. M., Campbell, C. E., and Nichols, T. F. Fri . "The Carrington event: Possible doses to crews in space from a comparable event". United States. doi:10.1016/j.asr.2005.01.111.
@article{osti_897689,
title = {The Carrington event: Possible doses to crews in space from a comparable event},
author = {Townsend, L. W. and Stephens, Daniel L. and Hoff, J. L. and Zapp, E. N. and Moussa, H. M. and Miller, T. M. and Campbell, C. E. and Nichols, T. F.},
abstractNote = {Recent ice core analyses suggest that the Carrington event of 1859 may have been the largest solar energetic particle event in the past several hundred years. Previous analyses of potential doses to humans and electronics from such an event suggested that a Carrington- like event, with a hard spectrum similar to that of the event of September 1989 could be catastrophic. Subsequent analyses of the 10Be concentration in the ice core data suggest that the spectral hardness of the Carrington event was softer and similar to the August 1972 event. In this work we review the earlier estimates of doses from a Carrington event, and present updated dose estimates for deep space crews and electronics using the Carrington event proton fluence P30 MeV in combination with an event spectrum similar to that of the August 1972 event. Potential ramifications of these doses for humans and electronics on deep space missions are discussed.},
doi = {10.1016/j.asr.2005.01.111},
journal = {Advances in Space Research, 38(2):226-231},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Dec 29 00:00:00 EST 2006},
month = {Fri Dec 29 00:00:00 EST 2006}
}
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