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Title: On-Road and Laboratory Evaluation of Combustion Aerosols -- Part 2: Summary of Spark Ignition Engine Results

Abstract

No abstract prepared.

Authors:
; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
897435
DOE Contract Number:
AC36-99-GO10337
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Journal of Aerosol Science; Journal Volume: 37; Journal Issue: 8, 2006
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION; 33 ADVANCED PROPULSION SYSTEMS; 42 ENGINEERING; 54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; AEROSOLS; COMBUSTION; EVALUATION; SPARK IGNITION ENGINES; Transportation

Citation Formats

Kittelson, D. B., Watts, W. F., Johnson, J. P., Schauer, J. J., and Lawson, D. R. On-Road and Laboratory Evaluation of Combustion Aerosols -- Part 2: Summary of Spark Ignition Engine Results. United States: N. p., 2006. Web. doi:10.1016/j.jaerosci.2005.08.008.
Kittelson, D. B., Watts, W. F., Johnson, J. P., Schauer, J. J., & Lawson, D. R. On-Road and Laboratory Evaluation of Combustion Aerosols -- Part 2: Summary of Spark Ignition Engine Results. United States. doi:10.1016/j.jaerosci.2005.08.008.
Kittelson, D. B., Watts, W. F., Johnson, J. P., Schauer, J. J., and Lawson, D. R. Sun . "On-Road and Laboratory Evaluation of Combustion Aerosols -- Part 2: Summary of Spark Ignition Engine Results". United States. doi:10.1016/j.jaerosci.2005.08.008.
@article{osti_897435,
title = {On-Road and Laboratory Evaluation of Combustion Aerosols -- Part 2: Summary of Spark Ignition Engine Results},
author = {Kittelson, D. B. and Watts, W. F. and Johnson, J. P. and Schauer, J. J. and Lawson, D. R.},
abstractNote = {No abstract prepared.},
doi = {10.1016/j.jaerosci.2005.08.008},
journal = {Journal of Aerosol Science},
number = 8, 2006,
volume = 37,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2006},
month = {Sun Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2006}
}
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