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Title: Cryoetch And Cryo-planing For Low Temperature HRSEM: SE-I Imaging Of Hydrated Multicellular, Microbial And Bioorganic Systems

Abstract

No abstract prepared.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Savannah River Ecology Laboratory (SREL), Aiken, SC
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
897340
Report Number(s):
SREL 2980
TRN: US200704%%573
DOE Contract Number:
DE-FC09-07SR22506
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Microscopy Microanalysis; Journal Volume: 12; Journal Issue: Supp 2
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; MICROORGANISMS; SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPY; SAMPLE PREPARATION

Citation Formats

Apkarian, R. P., S. A. Shamsi, S. A. Rizvi, G. Benian, A. L. Neal, J. V. Taylor and S. N. Dublin. Cryoetch And Cryo-planing For Low Temperature HRSEM: SE-I Imaging Of Hydrated Multicellular, Microbial And Bioorganic Systems. United States: N. p., 2006. Web. doi:10.1017/S1431927606063823.
Apkarian, R. P., S. A. Shamsi, S. A. Rizvi, G. Benian, A. L. Neal, J. V. Taylor and S. N. Dublin. Cryoetch And Cryo-planing For Low Temperature HRSEM: SE-I Imaging Of Hydrated Multicellular, Microbial And Bioorganic Systems. United States. doi:10.1017/S1431927606063823.
Apkarian, R. P., S. A. Shamsi, S. A. Rizvi, G. Benian, A. L. Neal, J. V. Taylor and S. N. Dublin. Sun . "Cryoetch And Cryo-planing For Low Temperature HRSEM: SE-I Imaging Of Hydrated Multicellular, Microbial And Bioorganic Systems". United States. doi:10.1017/S1431927606063823.
@article{osti_897340,
title = {Cryoetch And Cryo-planing For Low Temperature HRSEM: SE-I Imaging Of Hydrated Multicellular, Microbial And Bioorganic Systems},
author = {Apkarian, R. P., S. A. Shamsi, S. A. Rizvi, G. Benian, A. L. Neal, J. V. Taylor and S. N. Dublin},
abstractNote = {No abstract prepared.},
doi = {10.1017/S1431927606063823},
journal = {Microscopy Microanalysis},
number = Supp 2,
volume = 12,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2006},
month = {Sun Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2006}
}
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