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Title: Speciation and Attenuation of Arsenic and Selenium at Coal Combustion By-Product Management Facilities

Abstract

The overall objective of this project was to evaluate the impact of key constituents captured from power plant air streams (principally arsenic and selenium) on the disposal and utilization of coal combustion products (CCPs). Specific objectives of the project were: (1) to develop a comprehensive database of field leachate concentrations at a wide range of CCP management sites, including speciation of arsenic and selenium, and low-detection limit analyses for mercury; (2) to perform detailed evaluations of the release and attenuation of arsenic species at three CCP sites; and (3) to perform detailed evaluations of the release and attenuation of selenium species at three CCP sites. Each of these objectives was accomplished using a combination of field sampling and laboratory analysis and experimentation. All of the methods used and results obtained are contained in this report. For ease of use, the report is subdivided into three parts. Volume 1 contains methods and results for the field leachate characterization. Volume 2 contains methods and results for arsenic adsorption. Volume 3 contains methods and results for selenium adsorption.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Electric Power Research Institute
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
896977
DOE Contract Number:
FC26-02NT41590
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
01 COAL, LIGNITE, AND PEAT; ADSORPTION; AIR; ARSENIC; ATTENUATION; BY-PRODUCTS; COAL; COMBUSTION; COMBUSTION PRODUCTS; LEACHATES; MERCURY; POWER PLANTS; SAMPLING; SELENIUM

Citation Formats

K. Ladwig. Speciation and Attenuation of Arsenic and Selenium at Coal Combustion By-Product Management Facilities. United States: N. p., 2005. Web. doi:10.2172/896977.
K. Ladwig. Speciation and Attenuation of Arsenic and Selenium at Coal Combustion By-Product Management Facilities. United States. doi:10.2172/896977.
K. Ladwig. Sat . "Speciation and Attenuation of Arsenic and Selenium at Coal Combustion By-Product Management Facilities". United States. doi:10.2172/896977. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/896977.
@article{osti_896977,
title = {Speciation and Attenuation of Arsenic and Selenium at Coal Combustion By-Product Management Facilities},
author = {K. Ladwig},
abstractNote = {The overall objective of this project was to evaluate the impact of key constituents captured from power plant air streams (principally arsenic and selenium) on the disposal and utilization of coal combustion products (CCPs). Specific objectives of the project were: (1) to develop a comprehensive database of field leachate concentrations at a wide range of CCP management sites, including speciation of arsenic and selenium, and low-detection limit analyses for mercury; (2) to perform detailed evaluations of the release and attenuation of arsenic species at three CCP sites; and (3) to perform detailed evaluations of the release and attenuation of selenium species at three CCP sites. Each of these objectives was accomplished using a combination of field sampling and laboratory analysis and experimentation. All of the methods used and results obtained are contained in this report. For ease of use, the report is subdivided into three parts. Volume 1 contains methods and results for the field leachate characterization. Volume 2 contains methods and results for arsenic adsorption. Volume 3 contains methods and results for selenium adsorption.},
doi = {10.2172/896977},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Sat Dec 31 00:00:00 EST 2005},
month = {Sat Dec 31 00:00:00 EST 2005}
}

Technical Report:

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  • Following completion of contracting activities, sites were identified for the field leachate characterization study. Sampling and Analyses Plans (SAPs) and Site Access Agreements (SAAs) were developed for each site. A total of ten sites were sampled during this reporting period. Among the trace constituents, boron, silicon, and strontium were present in highest concentrations, with median values above 1 mg/L (1,000 {micro}g/L). Work on the first of three sites for the detailed arsenic and selenium adsorption studies began in 2002, prior to completion of the final DOE award. Kd values ranged from 100 to 12,000 L/kg for arsenic (V), 15 tomore » 160 L.kg for As(III), and 5 to 25 L/kg for Se(VI).« less
  • Field leachate samples are being collected from coal combustion product (CCP) management sites from several geographic locations in the United States to provide broad characterization of major and trace constituents in the leachate. In addition, speciation of arsenic, selenium, chromium, and mercury in the leachates is being determined. Through 2003, 35 samples were collected at 14 sites representing a variety of CCP types, management approaches, and source coals. Samples have been collected from leachate wells, leachate collection systems, drive-point piezometers, lysimeters, the ash/water interface at impoundments, impoundment outfalls and inlets, and seeps. Additional sampling at 23 sites has been conductedmore » in 2004 or is planned for 2005. First-year results suggest distinct differences in the chemical composition of leachate from landfills and impoundments, and from bituminous and subbituminous coals. Concentrations of most constituents were generally higher in landfill leachate than in impoundment leachate. Sulfate, sodium, aluminum, molybdenum, vanadium, cadmium, mercury and selenium concentrations were higher in leachates for ash from subbituminous source coal. Calcium, boron, lithium, strontium, arsenic, antimony, and nickel were higher for ash from bituminous source coal. These variations will be explored in more detail when additional data from the 2004 and 2005 samples become available.« less
  • Methods of sample preparation for the determination of total selenium, and selenite, selenate, arsenite, and arsenate in coal fly ash materials were evaluated. The measurement methods use atomic spectroscopy for the determination of total concentrations and ion chromatography (IC) for the determination of individual ionic species. Sample preparation procedures which minimize the loss or alteration of the species of interest was explored and defined. The utility of the sample preparation methods can be sample dependent, so caution is advised in their use. IC conditions were established for the determination in extract solutions of selenite, selenate, arsenite, and arsenate with minimalmore » interference from common anions.« less
  • Methods of sample preparation for the determination of total selenium, and selenite, selenate, arsenite, and arsenate in coal fly ash materials were evaluated. The measurement methods use atomic spectroscopy for the determination of total concentrations and ion chromatography (IC) for the determination of individual ionic species. Sample preparation procedures which minimize the loss or alteration of the species of interest was explored and defined. The utility of the sample preparation methods can be sample dependent, so caution is advised in their use. IC conditions were established for the determination in extract solutions of selenite, selenate, arsenite, and arsenate with minimalmore » interference from common anions.« less
  • Fossil fuel combustion can lead to an increased mobilization of selenium to the aquatic environment. In order to examine this process, the different chemical forms of selenium must be determined in water and sediments with high degrees of accuracy and precision. A selective hydride generation procedure was developed to measure the concentrations of dissolved selenite, selenate, total selenium, and organic selenides in natural waters. Two detetor systems were valuated, atomic absorption with quartz tube - air/hydrogen flame atomization, and gas chromatography with photo ionization detection. Results show that the photo ionization system has a high detection limit (10 ng Se),more » and a non-linear response. In contrast, the atomic absorption technique is able to detect 0.2 ng Se, and the instrumental response is linear to 96 ng Se. For the determination of selenium speciation, the precision (as relative standard deviation) is no greater than 5.4%; accuracy is assured using the standard additions method of calibration. In sediments, total selenium is solubilized using an oxidative digest, and a sodium hydroxide leach releases sedimentary selenite and selenate. Solutions from these pretreatments are analyzed using the dissolved selenium methods.« less