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Title: Probing the Disk-Jet Connection of the Radio Galaxy 3C120 Observed With Suzaku

Abstract

Broad line radio galaxies (BLRGs) are a rare type of radio-loud AGN, in which the broad optical permitted emission lines have been detected in addition to the extended jet emission. Here we report on deep (40ksec x 4) observations of the bright BLRG 3C 120 using Suzaku. The observations were spaced a week apart, and sample a range of continuum fluxes. An excellent broadband spectrum was obtained over two decades of frequency (0.6 to 50 keV) within each 40 ksec exposure. We clearly resolved the iron K emission line complex, finding that it consists of a narrow K{sub {alpha}} core ({sigma} {approx_equal} 110 eV or an EW of 60 eV), a 6.9 keV line, and an underlying broad iron line. Our confirmation of the broad line contrasts with the XMM-Newton observation in 2003, where the broad line was not required. The most natural interpretation of the broad line is iron K line emission from a face-on accretion disk which is truncated at {approx} 10 r{sub g}. Above 10 keV, a relatively weak Compton hump was detected (reflection fraction of R {approx_equal} 0.6), superposed on the primary X-ray continuum of {Lambda} {approx_equal} 1.75. Thanks to the good photon statistics and lowmore » background of the Suzaku data, we clearly confirm the spectral evolution of 3C 120, whereby the variability amplitude decreases with increasing energy. More strikingly, we discovered that the variability is caused by a steep power-law component of {Lambda} {approx_equal} 2.7, possibly related to the non-thermal jet emission. We discuss our findings in the context of similarities and differences between radio-loud/quiet objects.« less

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
896943
Report Number(s):
SLAC-PUB-12211
astro-ph/0612754; TRN: US200705%%83
DOE Contract Number:
AC02-76SF00515
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Submitted to Publ.Astron.Soc.Jap.
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; 72 PHYSICS OF ELEMENTARY PARTICLES AND FIELDS; ACCRETION DISKS; AMPLITUDES; IRON; PHOTONS; RADIO GALAXIES; REFLECTION; STATISTICS; Astrophysics,ASTRO

Citation Formats

Kataoka, Jun, Reeves, James N., Iwasawa, Kazushi, Markowitz, Alex G., Mushotzky, Richard F., Arimoto, Makoto, Takahashi, Tadayuki, Tsubuku, Yoshihiro, Ushio, Masayoshi, Watanabe, Shin, Gallo, Luigi C., Madejski, Greg M., Terashima, Yuichi, Isobe, Naoki, Tashiro, Makoto S., Kohmura, Takayoshi, and /Tokyo Inst. Tech. /NASA, Goddard /Garching, Max Planck Inst., MPE /JAXA, Sagamihara /SLAC /Ehime U. /Wako, RIKEN /Saitama U. /Kogakuin U.. Probing the Disk-Jet Connection of the Radio Galaxy 3C120 Observed With Suzaku. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1093/pasj/59.2.279.
Kataoka, Jun, Reeves, James N., Iwasawa, Kazushi, Markowitz, Alex G., Mushotzky, Richard F., Arimoto, Makoto, Takahashi, Tadayuki, Tsubuku, Yoshihiro, Ushio, Masayoshi, Watanabe, Shin, Gallo, Luigi C., Madejski, Greg M., Terashima, Yuichi, Isobe, Naoki, Tashiro, Makoto S., Kohmura, Takayoshi, & /Tokyo Inst. Tech. /NASA, Goddard /Garching, Max Planck Inst., MPE /JAXA, Sagamihara /SLAC /Ehime U. /Wako, RIKEN /Saitama U. /Kogakuin U.. Probing the Disk-Jet Connection of the Radio Galaxy 3C120 Observed With Suzaku. United States. doi:10.1093/pasj/59.2.279.
Kataoka, Jun, Reeves, James N., Iwasawa, Kazushi, Markowitz, Alex G., Mushotzky, Richard F., Arimoto, Makoto, Takahashi, Tadayuki, Tsubuku, Yoshihiro, Ushio, Masayoshi, Watanabe, Shin, Gallo, Luigi C., Madejski, Greg M., Terashima, Yuichi, Isobe, Naoki, Tashiro, Makoto S., Kohmura, Takayoshi, and /Tokyo Inst. Tech. /NASA, Goddard /Garching, Max Planck Inst., MPE /JAXA, Sagamihara /SLAC /Ehime U. /Wako, RIKEN /Saitama U. /Kogakuin U.. Wed . "Probing the Disk-Jet Connection of the Radio Galaxy 3C120 Observed With Suzaku". United States. doi:10.1093/pasj/59.2.279. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/896943.
@article{osti_896943,
title = {Probing the Disk-Jet Connection of the Radio Galaxy 3C120 Observed With Suzaku},
author = {Kataoka, Jun and Reeves, James N. and Iwasawa, Kazushi and Markowitz, Alex G. and Mushotzky, Richard F. and Arimoto, Makoto and Takahashi, Tadayuki and Tsubuku, Yoshihiro and Ushio, Masayoshi and Watanabe, Shin and Gallo, Luigi C. and Madejski, Greg M. and Terashima, Yuichi and Isobe, Naoki and Tashiro, Makoto S. and Kohmura, Takayoshi and /Tokyo Inst. Tech. /NASA, Goddard /Garching, Max Planck Inst., MPE /JAXA, Sagamihara /SLAC /Ehime U. /Wako, RIKEN /Saitama U. /Kogakuin U.},
abstractNote = {Broad line radio galaxies (BLRGs) are a rare type of radio-loud AGN, in which the broad optical permitted emission lines have been detected in addition to the extended jet emission. Here we report on deep (40ksec x 4) observations of the bright BLRG 3C 120 using Suzaku. The observations were spaced a week apart, and sample a range of continuum fluxes. An excellent broadband spectrum was obtained over two decades of frequency (0.6 to 50 keV) within each 40 ksec exposure. We clearly resolved the iron K emission line complex, finding that it consists of a narrow K{sub {alpha}} core ({sigma} {approx_equal} 110 eV or an EW of 60 eV), a 6.9 keV line, and an underlying broad iron line. Our confirmation of the broad line contrasts with the XMM-Newton observation in 2003, where the broad line was not required. The most natural interpretation of the broad line is iron K line emission from a face-on accretion disk which is truncated at {approx} 10 r{sub g}. Above 10 keV, a relatively weak Compton hump was detected (reflection fraction of R {approx_equal} 0.6), superposed on the primary X-ray continuum of {Lambda} {approx_equal} 1.75. Thanks to the good photon statistics and low background of the Suzaku data, we clearly confirm the spectral evolution of 3C 120, whereby the variability amplitude decreases with increasing energy. More strikingly, we discovered that the variability is caused by a steep power-law component of {Lambda} {approx_equal} 2.7, possibly related to the non-thermal jet emission. We discuss our findings in the context of similarities and differences between radio-loud/quiet objects.},
doi = {10.1093/pasj/59.2.279},
journal = {Submitted to Publ.Astron.Soc.Jap.},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Jan 03 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Wed Jan 03 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}
  • We present results from an 87 ks Suzaku observation of the canonical low-excitation radio galaxy (LERG) NGC 6251. We have previously suggested that LERGs violate conventional active galactic nucleus unification schemes: they may lack an obscuring torus and are likely to accrete in a radiatively inefficient manner, with almost all of the energy released by the accretion process being channeled into powerful jets. We model the 0.5-20 keV Suzaku spectrum with a single power law of photon index {Gamma} = 1.82{sup +0.04} {sub -0.05}, together with two collisionally ionized plasma models whose parameters are consistent with the known galaxy- andmore » group-scale thermal emission. Our observations confirm that there are no signatures of obscured, accretion-related X-ray emission in NGC 6251, and we show that the luminosity of any such component must be substantially sub-Eddington in nature.« less
  • We present the results of extensive multi-frequency monitoring of the radio galaxy 3C 120 between 2002 and 2007 at X-ray (2-10 keV), optical (R and V bands), and radio (14.5 and 37 GHz) wave bands, as well as imaging with the Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) at 43 GHz. Over the 5 yr of observation, significant dips in the X-ray light curve are followed by ejections of bright superluminal knots in the VLBA images. Consistent with this, the X-ray flux and 37 GHz flux are anti-correlated with X-ray leading the radio variations. Furthermore, the total radiative output of a radiomore » flare is related to the equivalent width of the corresponding X-ray dip. This implies that, in this radio galaxy, the radiative state of accretion disk plus corona system, where the X-rays are produced, has a direct effect on the events in the jet, where the radio emission originates. The X-ray power spectral density of 3C 120 shows a break, with steeper slope at shorter timescale and the break timescale is commensurate with the mass of the central black hole (BH) based on observations of Seyfert galaxies and black hole X-ray binaries (BHXRBs). These findings provide support for the paradigm that BHXRBs and both radio-loud and radio-quiet active galactic nuclei are fundamentally similar systems, with characteristic time and size scales linearly proportional to the mass of the central BH. The X-ray and optical variations are strongly correlated in 3C 120, which implies that the optical emission in this object arises from the same general region as the X-rays, i.e., in the accretion disk-corona system. We numerically model multi-wavelength light curves of 3C 120 from such a system with the optical-UV emission produced in the disk and the X-rays generated by scattering of thermal photons by hot electrons in the corona. From the comparison of the temporal properties of the model light curves to that of the observed variability, we constrain the physical size of the corona and the distances of the emitting regions from the central BH. In addition, we discuss physical scenarios for the disk-jet connection that are consistent with our observations.« less
  • We present the results of extensive multi-frequency monitoring of the radio galaxy 3C 111 between 2004 and 2010 at X-ray (2.4-10 keV), optical (R band), and radio (14.5, 37, and 230 GHz) wave bands, as well as multi-epoch imaging with the Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) at 43 GHz. Over the six years of observation, significant dips in the X-ray light curve are followed by ejections of bright superluminal knots in the VLBA images. This shows a clear connection between the radiative state near the black hole, where the X-rays are produced, and events in the jet. The X-ray continuummore » flux and Fe line intensity are strongly correlated, with a time lag shorter than 90 days and consistent with zero. This implies that the Fe line is generated within 90 lt-day of the source of the X-ray continuum. The power spectral density function of X-ray variations contains a break, with a steeper slope at shorter timescales. The break timescale of 13{sup +12}{sub -6} days is commensurate with scaling according to the mass of the central black hole based on observations of Seyfert galaxies and black hole X-ray binaries (BHXRBs). The data are consistent with the standard paradigm, in which the X-rays are predominantly produced by inverse Compton scattering of thermal optical/UV seed photons from the accretion disk by a distribution of hot electrons-the corona-situated near the disk. Most of the optical emission is generated in the accretion disk due to reprocessing of the X-ray emission. The relationships that we have uncovered between the accretion disk and the jet in 3C 111, as well as in the Fanaroff-Riley class I radio galaxy 3C 120 in a previous paper, support the paradigm that active galactic nuclei and Galactic BHXRBs are fundamentally similar, with characteristic time and size scales proportional to the mass of the central black hole.« less
  • We report on Suzaku observations of selected regions within the southern giant lobe of the radio galaxy Centaurus A. In our analysis we focus on distinct X-ray features detected with the X-ray Imaging Spectrometer within the range 0.5-10 keV, some of which are likely associated with fine structure of the lobe revealed by recent high-quality radio intensity and polarization maps. With the available photon statistics, we find that the spectral properties of the detected X-ray features are equally consistent with thermal emission from hot gas with temperatures kT > 1 keV, or with a power-law radiation continuum characterized by photonmore » indices {Gamma} {approx} 2.0 {+-} 0.5. However, the plasma parameters implied by these different models favor a synchrotron origin for the analyzed X-ray spots, indicating that a very efficient acceleration of electrons up to {approx}> 10 TeV energies is taking place within the giant structure of Centaurus A, albeit only in isolated and compact regions associated with extended and highly polarized radio filaments. We also present a detailed analysis of the diffuse X-ray emission filling the whole field of view of the instrument, resulting in a tentative detection of a soft excess component best fitted by a thermal model with a temperature of kT {approx} 0.5 keV. The exact origin of the observed excess remains uncertain, although energetic considerations point to thermal gas filling the bulk of the volume of the lobe and mixed with the non-thermal plasma, rather than to the alternative scenario involving a condensation of the hot intergalactic medium around the edges of the expanding radio structure. If correct, this would be the first detection of the thermal content of the extended lobes of a radio galaxy in X-rays. The corresponding number density of the thermal gas in such a case is n{sub g} {approx} 10{sup -4} cm{sup -3}, while its pressure appears to be in almost exact equipartition with the volume-averaged non-thermal pressure provided by the radio-emitting electrons and the lobes' magnetic field. A prominent large-scale fluctuation of the Galactic foreground emission, resulting in excess foreground X-ray emission aligned with the lobe, cannot be ruled out. Although tentative, our findings potentially imply that the structure of the extended lobes in active galaxies is likely to be highly inhomogeneous and non-uniform, with magnetic reconnection and turbulent acceleration processes continuously converting magnetic energy to internal energy of the plasma particles, leading to possibly significant spatial and temporal variations in the plasma {beta} parameter around the volume-averaged equilibrium condition {beta} {approx} 1.« less