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Title: Characterizing the Catalytic Potential of Deinococcus, Arthrobacter and other Robust Bacteria in Contaminated Subsurface Environments of the Hanford Site

Abstract

Ionizing Radiation (IR) Resistance in Bacteria. Until recently, there have been no clear physiologic predictors of a cell's ability to recover from ionizing radiation (IR) and other DOE-relevant oxidative stress conditions. In general, the most resistant bacteria have been Gram-positive (e.g., Deinococcus, Arthrobacter, Lactobacillus & Enterococcus spp.) and the most sensitive have been Gram-negative (e.g., Pseudomonas, Shewanella & Neisseria spp.). However, there are several reported exceptions to this paradigm, the Gram-negative cyanobacterium Chroococcidiopsis is extremely resistant to IR, whereas the Gram-positive Micrococcus luteus is sensitive. We have identified biomolecular signatures for radiation sensitivity and resistance which are independent of phylogeny, where very high and very low intracellular Mn/Fe concentration ratios correlated with very high and very low resistances, respectively; and restricting Mn(II) in the famously resistant Deinococcus radiodurans sensitized this eubacterium to IR.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Henry M. Jackson Foundation
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC)
OSTI Identifier:
896788
Report Number(s):
ERSD-1024774-2006
R&D Project: ERSD 1024774; TRN: US0700843
DOE Contract Number:
FG02-04ER63918
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
12 MANAGEMENT OF RADIOACTIVE WASTES, AND NON-RADIOACTIVE WASTES FROM NUCLEAR FACILITIES; 54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; 59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; BACTERIA; CONCENTRATION RATIO; IONIZING RADIATIONS; LACTOBACILLUS; MICROCOCCUS LUTEUS; PSEUDOMONAS; RADIATIONS; SENSITIVITY

Citation Formats

Daly, Michael J. Characterizing the Catalytic Potential of Deinococcus, Arthrobacter and other Robust Bacteria in Contaminated Subsurface Environments of the Hanford Site. United States: N. p., 2006. Web. doi:10.2172/896788.
Daly, Michael J. Characterizing the Catalytic Potential of Deinococcus, Arthrobacter and other Robust Bacteria in Contaminated Subsurface Environments of the Hanford Site. United States. doi:10.2172/896788.
Daly, Michael J. Mon . "Characterizing the Catalytic Potential of Deinococcus, Arthrobacter and other Robust Bacteria in Contaminated Subsurface Environments of the Hanford Site". United States. doi:10.2172/896788. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/896788.
@article{osti_896788,
title = {Characterizing the Catalytic Potential of Deinococcus, Arthrobacter and other Robust Bacteria in Contaminated Subsurface Environments of the Hanford Site},
author = {Daly, Michael J.},
abstractNote = {Ionizing Radiation (IR) Resistance in Bacteria. Until recently, there have been no clear physiologic predictors of a cell's ability to recover from ionizing radiation (IR) and other DOE-relevant oxidative stress conditions. In general, the most resistant bacteria have been Gram-positive (e.g., Deinococcus, Arthrobacter, Lactobacillus & Enterococcus spp.) and the most sensitive have been Gram-negative (e.g., Pseudomonas, Shewanella & Neisseria spp.). However, there are several reported exceptions to this paradigm, the Gram-negative cyanobacterium Chroococcidiopsis is extremely resistant to IR, whereas the Gram-positive Micrococcus luteus is sensitive. We have identified biomolecular signatures for radiation sensitivity and resistance which are independent of phylogeny, where very high and very low intracellular Mn/Fe concentration ratios correlated with very high and very low resistances, respectively; and restricting Mn(II) in the famously resistant Deinococcus radiodurans sensitized this eubacterium to IR.},
doi = {10.2172/896788},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon May 01 00:00:00 EDT 2006},
month = {Mon May 01 00:00:00 EDT 2006}
}

Technical Report:

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  • Natural selection in highly radioactive waste sites may yield bacteria with favorable bioremediating characteristics. However, until recently the microbial ecology of such environments has remained unexplored because of the high costs and technical complexities associated with extracting and characterizing samples from such sites. We have examined the bacterial ecology within radioactive sediments from a high-level nuclear waste plume in the vadose zone on the DOE?s Hanford Site in south-central Washington state (Fredrickson et al, 2004). Manganese-dependent, radiation resistant bacteria have been isolated from this contaminated site including the highly Mn-dependent Deinococcus and Arthrobacter spp.
  • Until recently, there have been no clear physiologic predictors of a cell's ability to recover from ionizing radiation (IR), desiccation, and other DOE-relevant oxidative stress conditions. In general, the most resistant bacteria have been Gram-positive (e.g., Deinococcus, Arthrobacter, Lactobacillus & Enterococcus spp.) and the most sensitive have been Gram-negative (e.g., Pseudomonas, Shewanella & Neisseria spp.). However, there are several reported exceptions to this paradigm, the Gram-negative cyanobacterium Chroococcidiopsis is extremely resistant to IR, whereas the Gram-positive Micrococcus luteus is sensitive. We have identified biomolecular signatures for radiation sensitivity and resistance which are independent of phylogeny, where very high and verymore » low intracellular Mn/Fe concentration ratios correlated with very high and very low resistances, respectively; and restricting Mn(II) in the famously resistant Deinococcus radiodurans sensitized this eubacterium to IR (http://cfyn.ifas.ufl.edu/radiation.pdf).« less
  • Progress is briefly summarized in these areas: ionizing radiation resistance in bacteria; a hypothesis regarding ionizing radiation resistance emerging for bacterial cells; transcriptome analysis of irradiated D. radiodurans and Shewanella oneidensis; the role of metal reduction in Mn-dependnet Deinococcal species; and engineered Deinococcus strains as models for bioremediation. Key findings are also reported regarding protein oxidation as a possible key to bacterial desiccation resistance, and the whole-genome sequence of the thermophile Deinococcus geothermalis.
  • Tryptophan dependent mutants of Arthrobacter globiformis ATCC 8010 were isolated and trp genes were cloned by complementation and marker rescue of the auxotrophic strains. Rescue studies and preliminary sequence analysis reveal that at least the genes trpE, trpC, and trpB are clustered together in this organism. In addition, sequence analysis of the entire trpE gene, which encodes component I of anthranilate synthase, is described. Segments of the trpE gene from 17 subsurface isolates of Arthrobacter sp. were amplified by PCR and sequenced. The partial trpE sequences from the various strains were aligned and subjected to phylogenetic analysis. The data suggestmore » that in addition to single base changes, recombination and genetic exchange play a major role in the evolution of the Arthrobacter genome.« less
  • At the contaminated DOE sites, sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) are a significant population and play an important role in the microbial community during biostimulation for metal reduction. However, the diversity, structure and dynamics of SRB communities are poorly understood. Therefore, this project aims to use high throughput sequencing-based metagenomics technologies for characterizing the diversity, structure, functions, and activities of SRB communities by developing genomic and bioinformatics tools to link the SRB biodiversity with ecosystem functioning.