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Title: Who Owns Your Computer? [digital rights management]

Abstract

Sony's much debated choice to use rootkit-like technology to protect intellectual property highlights the increasingly blurry line between who can, should, or does control the interaction between among a computational device, an algorithm embodied in software, and the data upon which it acts. Article discusses educational aspects of the situation.

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
896771
Report Number(s):
PNNL-SA-49310
TRN: US200704%%8
DOE Contract Number:
AC05-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: IEEE Security & Privacy, 4(2):61-63
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
99 GENERAL AND MISCELLANEOUS//MATHEMATICS, COMPUTING, AND INFORMATION SCIENCE; ALGORITHMS; MANAGEMENT; CONTROL; COMPUTER NETWORKS; COMPUTER CODES; PROPERTY RIGHTS; Security, Education, Sony

Citation Formats

Bishop, Matt, and Frincke, Deb A. Who Owns Your Computer? [digital rights management]. United States: N. p., 2006. Web. doi:10.1109/MSP.2006.56.
Bishop, Matt, & Frincke, Deb A. Who Owns Your Computer? [digital rights management]. United States. doi:10.1109/MSP.2006.56.
Bishop, Matt, and Frincke, Deb A. Wed . "Who Owns Your Computer? [digital rights management]". United States. doi:10.1109/MSP.2006.56.
@article{osti_896771,
title = {Who Owns Your Computer? [digital rights management]},
author = {Bishop, Matt and Frincke, Deb A.},
abstractNote = {Sony's much debated choice to use rootkit-like technology to protect intellectual property highlights the increasingly blurry line between who can, should, or does control the interaction between among a computational device, an algorithm embodied in software, and the data upon which it acts. Article discusses educational aspects of the situation.},
doi = {10.1109/MSP.2006.56},
journal = {IEEE Security & Privacy, 4(2):61-63},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Mar 01 00:00:00 EST 2006},
month = {Wed Mar 01 00:00:00 EST 2006}
}
  • The utility industry is developing a new type of market that represents something quite different from anything seen in the past. Led by the gas pipeline industry (not known for its breathtaking technological advancement), unregulated markets are being created in the rights to services provided by facilities that operate under a traditional cost-based regulated regime.
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