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Title: Micrometeorological and Soil Data for Calculating Evapotranspiration for Rainier Mesa, Nevada Test Site, Nevada 2002-05.

Abstract

Micrometeorological and soil-moisture data were collected at two instrumented sites on Rainier Mesa at the Nevada Test Site, January 1, 2002/August 23, 2005. Data collected at each site include net radiation, air temperature, and relative humidity at two heights; wind speed and direction; subsurface soil heat flux; subsurface soil temperature; volumetric soil water; and matric water potential. These data were used to estimate 20-minute average and daily average evapotranspiration values. The data presented in this report are collected and calculated evapotranspiration rates.

Authors:
; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
United States Geological Survey - Nevada, Henderson, Nevada
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE - National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)
OSTI Identifier:
896768
Report Number(s):
USGS OFR 2006-1312
TRN: US200709%%481
DOE Contract Number:
AI52-01NV13944
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; 58 GEOSCIENCES; HEAT FLUX; HUMIDITY; NEVADA TEST SITE; SOILS; VELOCITY; WATER; Micrometeorological; soil data; evapotranspiration; Rainier Mesa; Nevada; Nevada Test Site

Citation Formats

Guy A. DeMeo, Alan L. Flint, Randell J. Laczniak, and Walter E. Nylund. Micrometeorological and Soil Data for Calculating Evapotranspiration for Rainier Mesa, Nevada Test Site, Nevada 2002-05.. United States: N. p., 2006. Web. doi:10.2172/896768.
Guy A. DeMeo, Alan L. Flint, Randell J. Laczniak, & Walter E. Nylund. Micrometeorological and Soil Data for Calculating Evapotranspiration for Rainier Mesa, Nevada Test Site, Nevada 2002-05.. United States. doi:10.2172/896768.
Guy A. DeMeo, Alan L. Flint, Randell J. Laczniak, and Walter E. Nylund. Thu . "Micrometeorological and Soil Data for Calculating Evapotranspiration for Rainier Mesa, Nevada Test Site, Nevada 2002-05.". United States. doi:10.2172/896768. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/896768.
@article{osti_896768,
title = {Micrometeorological and Soil Data for Calculating Evapotranspiration for Rainier Mesa, Nevada Test Site, Nevada 2002-05.},
author = {Guy A. DeMeo and Alan L. Flint and Randell J. Laczniak and Walter E. Nylund},
abstractNote = {Micrometeorological and soil-moisture data were collected at two instrumented sites on Rainier Mesa at the Nevada Test Site, January 1, 2002/August 23, 2005. Data collected at each site include net radiation, air temperature, and relative humidity at two heights; wind speed and direction; subsurface soil heat flux; subsurface soil temperature; volumetric soil water; and matric water potential. These data were used to estimate 20-minute average and daily average evapotranspiration values. The data presented in this report are collected and calculated evapotranspiration rates.},
doi = {10.2172/896768},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Dec 28 00:00:00 EST 2006},
month = {Thu Dec 28 00:00:00 EST 2006}
}

Technical Report:

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  • This report presents particle size analysis, field-saturated hydraulic conductivity measurements, and qualitative descriptions of surficial materials at selected locations at Rainier Mesa, Nevada. Measurements and sample collection were conducted in the Rainier Mesa area, including unconsolidated sediments on top of the mesa, an ephemeral wash channel near the mesa edge, and dry U12n tunnel pond sediments below the mesa. Particle size analysis used a combination of sieving and optical diffraction techniques. Field-saturated hydraulic conductivity measurements employed a single-ring infiltrometer with analytical formulas that correct for falling head and spreading outside the ring domain. These measurements may prove useful to currentmore » and future efforts at Rainier Mesa aimed at understanding infiltration and its effect on water fluxes and radionuclide transport in the unsaturated zone.« less
  • The United States Department of Energy (DOE) and the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) at their Nevada Site Office (NSO) are addressing ground-water contamination resulting from historical underground nuclear testing through the Environmental Management (EM) program and, in particular, the Underground Test Area (UGTA) project. From 1951 to 1992, 828 underground nuclear tests were conducted at the Nevada Test Site northwest of Las Vegas. Most of these tests were conducted hundreds of feet above the ground-water table; however, more than 200 of the tests were near or within the water table. This underground testing was limited to specific areas ofmore » the Nevada Test Site, including Pahute Mesa, Rainier Mesa/Shoshone Mountain, Frenchman Flat, and Yucca Flat. One issue of concern is the nature of the somewhat poorly constrained pre-Tertiary geology, and its effects on ground-water flow. Ground-water modelers would like to know more about the hydrostratigraphy and geologic structure to support a hydrostratigraphic framework model that is under development for the Rainier Mesa/Shoshone Mountain Corrective Action Unit (Bechtel Nevada, 2006). During 2005, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the DOE and NNSA-NSO, collected and processed data from twenty-six magnetotelluric (MT) and audio-magnetotelluric (AMT) sites at the Nevada Test Site. The 2005 data stations were located on and near Rainier Mesa and Shoshone Mountain to assist in characterizing the pre-Tertiary geology in those areas. These new stations extend the area of the hydrogeologic study previously conducted in Yucca Flat. This work will help refine what is known about the character, thickness, and lateral extent of pre-Tertiary confining units. In particular, a major goal has been to define the upper clastic confining unit (UCCU – late Devonian to Mississippian-age siliciclastic rocks assigned to the Eleana Formation and Chainman Shale) from the Yucca Flat area and west towards Shoshone Mountain, to Buckboard Mesa in the south, and onto Rainier Mesa in the north. Subsequent interpretation will include a three-dimensional (3-D) character analysis and a two-dimensional (2-D) resistivity model. The purpose of this report is to release the MT sounding data for the twenty-six stations shown in figure 1. No interpretation of the data is included here.« less
  • This document presents a summary and framework of the available hydrologic data and other information directly relevant to the development of the Rainier Mesa/Shoshone Mountain (RMSM) Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 99 groundwater flow models. Where appropriate, data and information documented elsewhere are briefly summarized with reference to the complete documentation.
  • Seismic refraction surveys have been obtained sporadically in tunnels in zeolitized tuff at the Nevada Test Site since the late 1950's. Commencing in 1967 and continuing to date (1982), extensive measurements of shear- and compressional-wave velocities have been made in five tunnel complexes in Rainier and Aqueduct Mesas and in one tunnel complex in Shoshone Mountain. The results of these surveys to 1980 are compiled in this report. In addition, extensive horizontal drilling was initiated in 1967 in connection with geologic exploration in these tunnel complexes for sites for nuclear weapons tests. Seismic and electrical surveys were conducted in themore » majority of these holes. The type and location of these tunnel and borehole surveys are indexed in this report. Synthesis of the seismic refraction data indicates a mean compressional-wave velocity near the nuclear device point (WP) of 23 tunnel events of 2430 m/s (7970 f/s) with a range of 1846 to 2753 m/s (6060 to 9030 f/s). The mean shear-wave velocity of 17 tunnel events is 1276 m/s (4190 f/s) with a range of 1140 to 1392 m/s (3740 to 4570 f/s). Experience indicates that these velocity variations are due chiefly to the extent of fracturing and (or) the presence of partially saturated rock in the region of the survey.« less
  • The U12n.03 drift was designed for a nuclear test site and mining was started on April 18, 1966, and completed May 22, 1967. The drift was driven along a bearing of N. 26/sup 0/ W. at an elevation of 1849.2 m (6067 ft) to a total length of 660.2 m (2166 ft). The drift lies entirely within tunnel bed 4 of Tertiary age and crosses at nearly right angles, the Aqueduct syncline, a prominent geologic feature in Rainier Mesa. A combination of faults cutting nearly parallel to the drift, weak clay-rich tuff, and excessive ground water, all occurring in themore » trough of the syncline caused severe construction and support problems. These geologic factors created weak plastic rock that resulted in swelling and squeezing ground. Remedial measures were initiated that only temporarily stabilized ground and water conditions. The drift was eventually abandoned for the purposes of a nuclear test site and was subsequently used as a water storage facility. The US Geological Survey performed seismic velocity, electrical resistivity, and geologic surveys in the U12n.03 drift to provide information needed for site evaluation. Electrical resistivity measurements indicate that sections of rock which may be potentially unstable for tunnel construction due to the presence of clay may be defined by this technique.« less