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Title: Effects of Ionizing Radiation on Cellular Structures, Induced Instability, and Carcinogenesis

Abstract

According to the American Cancer Society, the United States can expect 1,368,030 new cases of cancer in 2004 [1]. Among the many carcinogens Americans are exposed to, ionizing radiation will contribute to this statistic. Humans live in a radiation environment. Ionizing radiation is in the air we breathe, the earth we live on, and the food we eat. Man-made radiation adds to this naturally occurring radiation level thereby increasing the chance for human exposure. For many decades the scientific community, governmental regulatory bodies, and concerned citizens have struggled to estimate health risks associated with radiation exposures, particularly at low doses. While cancer induction is the primary concern and the most important somatic effect of exposure to ionizing radiation, potential health risks do not involve neoplastic diseases exclusively but also include somatic mutations that might contribute to birth defects and ocular maladies, and heritable mutations that might impact on disease risks in future generations. Consequently it is important we understand the effect of ionizingradiation on cellular structures and the subsequent long-term health risks associated with exposure to ionizing radiation.

Authors:
; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (US), Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
894859
Report Number(s):
PNNL-SA-43269
3482; KP1704020; TRN: US0700327
DOE Contract Number:  
AC05-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Book
Resource Relation:
Related Information: Cancer: Cell Structures, and Tumour Pathogenesis, Experientia Supplementum, 96:293-301
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
63 RADIATION, THERMAL, AND OTHER ENVIRONMENTAL POLLUTANT EFFECTS ON LIVING ORGANISMS AND BIOLOGICAL MATERIALS; CARCINOGENESIS; CARCINOGENS; INSTABILITY; IONIZING RADIATIONS; MUTATIONS; NEOPLASMS; SOMATIC MUTATIONS; HEALTH HAZARDS; Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory

Citation Formats

Resat, Marianne S., Arthurs, Benjamin J., Estes, Brian J., and Morgan, William F. Effects of Ionizing Radiation on Cellular Structures, Induced Instability, and Carcinogenesis. United States: N. p., 2006. Web.
Resat, Marianne S., Arthurs, Benjamin J., Estes, Brian J., & Morgan, William F. Effects of Ionizing Radiation on Cellular Structures, Induced Instability, and Carcinogenesis. United States.
Resat, Marianne S., Arthurs, Benjamin J., Estes, Brian J., and Morgan, William F. Wed . "Effects of Ionizing Radiation on Cellular Structures, Induced Instability, and Carcinogenesis". United States.
@article{osti_894859,
title = {Effects of Ionizing Radiation on Cellular Structures, Induced Instability, and Carcinogenesis},
author = {Resat, Marianne S. and Arthurs, Benjamin J. and Estes, Brian J. and Morgan, William F.},
abstractNote = {According to the American Cancer Society, the United States can expect 1,368,030 new cases of cancer in 2004 [1]. Among the many carcinogens Americans are exposed to, ionizing radiation will contribute to this statistic. Humans live in a radiation environment. Ionizing radiation is in the air we breathe, the earth we live on, and the food we eat. Man-made radiation adds to this naturally occurring radiation level thereby increasing the chance for human exposure. For many decades the scientific community, governmental regulatory bodies, and concerned citizens have struggled to estimate health risks associated with radiation exposures, particularly at low doses. While cancer induction is the primary concern and the most important somatic effect of exposure to ionizing radiation, potential health risks do not involve neoplastic diseases exclusively but also include somatic mutations that might contribute to birth defects and ocular maladies, and heritable mutations that might impact on disease risks in future generations. Consequently it is important we understand the effect of ionizingradiation on cellular structures and the subsequent long-term health risks associated with exposure to ionizing radiation.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2006},
month = {3}
}

Book:
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