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Title: EUV testing of multilayer mirrors: critical issues

Abstract

Recently, while performing extensive EUV irradiation endurance testing on Ru-capped multilayer mirrors in the presence of elevated partial pressures of water and hydrocarbons, NIST has observed that the amount of EUV-induced damage actually decreases with increasing levels of water vapor above {approx} 5 x 10{sup -7} Torr. It is thought that the admitted water vapor may interact with otherwise stable, condensed carbonaceous species in an UHV vacuum system to increase the background levels of simple gaseous carbon-containing molecules. Some support for this hypothesis was demonstrated by observing the mitigating effect of very small levels of simple hydrocarbons with the intentional introduction of methyl alcohol in addition to the water vapor. It was found that the damage rate decreased by at least an order of magnitude when the partial pressure of methyl alcohol was just one percent of the water partial pressure. These observations indicate that the hydrocarbon components of the vacuum environment under actual testing conditions must be characterized and controlled to 10{sup -11} Torr or better in order to quantify the damage caused by high levels of water vapor. The possible effects of exposure beam size and out-of-band radiation on mirror lifetime testing will also be discussed.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
894751
Report Number(s):
UCRL-PROC-219279
TRN: US200702%%337
DOE Contract Number:
W-7405-ENG-48
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Presented at: SPIE Microlithography, San Jose, CA, United States, Feb 19 - Feb 24, 2006
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
10 SYNTHETIC FUELS; 71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; HYDROCARBONS; HYPOTHESIS; IRRADIATION; LIFETIME; METHANOL; MIRRORS; PARTIAL PRESSURE; RADIATIONS; TESTING; VACUUM SYSTEMS; WATER; WATER VAPOR

Citation Formats

Hill, S B, Ermanoski, I, Grantham, S, Tarrio, C, Lucatorto, T B, Madey, T E, Bajt, S, Chandhok, M, Yan, P, Wood, O, Wurn, S, and Edwards, N V. EUV testing of multilayer mirrors: critical issues. United States: N. p., 2006. Web.
Hill, S B, Ermanoski, I, Grantham, S, Tarrio, C, Lucatorto, T B, Madey, T E, Bajt, S, Chandhok, M, Yan, P, Wood, O, Wurn, S, & Edwards, N V. EUV testing of multilayer mirrors: critical issues. United States.
Hill, S B, Ermanoski, I, Grantham, S, Tarrio, C, Lucatorto, T B, Madey, T E, Bajt, S, Chandhok, M, Yan, P, Wood, O, Wurn, S, and Edwards, N V. Fri . "EUV testing of multilayer mirrors: critical issues". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/894751.
@article{osti_894751,
title = {EUV testing of multilayer mirrors: critical issues},
author = {Hill, S B and Ermanoski, I and Grantham, S and Tarrio, C and Lucatorto, T B and Madey, T E and Bajt, S and Chandhok, M and Yan, P and Wood, O and Wurn, S and Edwards, N V},
abstractNote = {Recently, while performing extensive EUV irradiation endurance testing on Ru-capped multilayer mirrors in the presence of elevated partial pressures of water and hydrocarbons, NIST has observed that the amount of EUV-induced damage actually decreases with increasing levels of water vapor above {approx} 5 x 10{sup -7} Torr. It is thought that the admitted water vapor may interact with otherwise stable, condensed carbonaceous species in an UHV vacuum system to increase the background levels of simple gaseous carbon-containing molecules. Some support for this hypothesis was demonstrated by observing the mitigating effect of very small levels of simple hydrocarbons with the intentional introduction of methyl alcohol in addition to the water vapor. It was found that the damage rate decreased by at least an order of magnitude when the partial pressure of methyl alcohol was just one percent of the water partial pressure. These observations indicate that the hydrocarbon components of the vacuum environment under actual testing conditions must be characterized and controlled to 10{sup -11} Torr or better in order to quantify the damage caused by high levels of water vapor. The possible effects of exposure beam size and out-of-band radiation on mirror lifetime testing will also be discussed.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Feb 24 00:00:00 EST 2006},
month = {Fri Feb 24 00:00:00 EST 2006}
}

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  • Ongoing endurance testing of Ru-capped multilayer mirrors (MLMs) at the NIST synchrotron facility has revealed that the damage resulting from EUV irradiation does not always depend on the exposure conditions in an intuitive way. Previous exposures of Ru-capped MLMs to EUV radiation in the presence of water vapor demonstrated that the mirror damage rate actually decreases with increasing water pressure. We will present results of recent exposures showing that the reduction in damage for partial pressures of water up to 5 x 10{sup -6} Torr is not the result of a spatially uniform decrease in damage across the Gaussian intensitymore » distribution of the incident EUV beam. Instead we observe a drop in the damage rate in the center of the exposure spot where the intensity is greatest, while the reflectivity loss in the wings of the intensity distribution appears to be independent of water partial pressure. (See Fig. 1.) We will discuss how the overall damage rate and spatial profile can be influenced by admixtures of carbon-containing species (e.g., CO, CO{sub 2}, C{sub 6}H{sub 6}) at partial pressures one-to-two orders of magnitude lower than the water vapor partial pressure. An investigation is underway to find the cause of the non-Gaussian damage profile. Preliminary results and hypotheses will be discussed. In addition to high-resolution reflectometry of the EUV-exposure sites, the results of surface analysis such as XPS will be presented. We will also discuss how the bandwidth and time structure of incident EUV radiation may affect the rate of reflectivity degradation. Although the observations presented here are based on exposures of Ru-capped MLMs, unless novel capping layers are similarly characterized, direct application of accelerated testing results could significantly overestimate mirror lifetime in the production environment.« less
  • Metal multilayer mirrors have been designed for the ALEXIS satellite, which is to carry six wide field telescopes to perform an all-sky survey in three or four narrow wavelength bands in the EUV. Comprised of alternating layers of molybdenum and silicon, the mirrors are optimized to provide maximum reflectivity at angles from 11.5 to 17/degree/ off normal incidence and at wavelengths of 133, 171, or 186A. Simultaneously, the mirrors use a ''wavetrap'' described below to suppress reflectivity at 304A, where the extremely strong geocoronal line of He II causes severe background problems. Low reflectivity at 304A is achieved by superposingmore » two layer pairs that provide destructive interference with an effective 2d spacing of 152A. The Mo layers in this wavetrap must be very thin, about 10A each, in order to allow the shorter wavelengths desired for peak reflectivity to penetrate without significant attenuation. Because refraction changes the effective angle of passage through the wavetrap, a joint optimization between layer thicknesses in the deep layers and the wavetrap layers must be performed for each target peak wavelength. For the 186A mirror, the optimum design from substrate upward is 40 layer pairs, each 74A Si and 31A Mo, followed by 2 layer pairs, each 55A Si and 10A Mo. Calculations predict this design will have a peak reflectivity at 186A of 35 percent and a 304A reflectivity less than 10/sup /minus/5/, if available optical constants are correct and the multilayer can be fabricated without difficulty. We will present details of the calculations and laboratory measurements of the reflectivity performance attained with prototype mirrors. 6 refs., 2 figs.« less
  • The reflectance stability of multilayer coatings for extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) in a commercial tool environment is of uttermost importance to ensure continuous exposures with minimum maintenance cost. We have made substantial progress in designing the protective capping layer coatings, understanding their performance and estimating their lifetimes based on accelerated electron beam and EUV exposure studies. Our current capping layer coatings have about 40 times longer lifetimes than Si-capped multilayer optics. Nevertheless, the lifetime of current Ru-capped multilayers is too short to satisfy commercial tool requirements and further improvements are essential.
  • Mo/Si multilayer coatings reflecting at 131 {angstrom} were deposited successfully on the AIA primary and secondary flight mirrors and on two coating witness Si wafers, on November 16, 2005, at LLNL. All coatings were characterized by means of EUV reflectance measurements at beamline 6.3.2 of the Advanced Light Source (ALS) synchrotron at LBNL, and were found to be well within specifications.