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Title: A Multiscale Approach for the Understanding of Water Film Formation

Abstract

Reductive immobilization of toxic and radioactive metals by gaseous hydrogen sulfide is a promising technology for in-situ remediation of soils and groundwater (Fig. 1 & 2). Rate of chromium(VI) reduction by gaseous hydrogen sulfide in the vadose zone soil is controlled by gas phase humidity and soil particle size (Fig. 3). It is believed that water film formation on solid surfaces is needed for effective contaminant reduction and immobilization (Fig. 4). Molecular Dynamics (MD) Simulation is used to understand the mechanism of water film formation.

Authors:
; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
University of Missouri-Columba, MO; Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC)
OSTI Identifier:
894679
Report Number(s):
CONF-ERSP2006-53
TRN: US0700231
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Annual Environmental Remediation Sciences Program PI Meeting, April 3-5, 2006, Warrenton, VA
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
38 RADIATION CHEMISTRY, RADIOCHEMISTRY, AND NUCLEAR CHEMISTRY; 54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; HUMIDITY; HYDROGEN SULFIDES; PARTICLE SIZE; SIMULATION; SOILS; WATER

Citation Formats

Baolin Deng, Bing Hua, Young Gan, Zhen Chen, and Thornton, Edward. A Multiscale Approach for the Understanding of Water Film Formation. United States: N. p., 2006. Web.
Baolin Deng, Bing Hua, Young Gan, Zhen Chen, & Thornton, Edward. A Multiscale Approach for the Understanding of Water Film Formation. United States.
Baolin Deng, Bing Hua, Young Gan, Zhen Chen, and Thornton, Edward. Wed . "A Multiscale Approach for the Understanding of Water Film Formation". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/894679.
@article{osti_894679,
title = {A Multiscale Approach for the Understanding of Water Film Formation},
author = {Baolin Deng and Bing Hua and Young Gan and Zhen Chen and Thornton, Edward},
abstractNote = {Reductive immobilization of toxic and radioactive metals by gaseous hydrogen sulfide is a promising technology for in-situ remediation of soils and groundwater (Fig. 1 & 2). Rate of chromium(VI) reduction by gaseous hydrogen sulfide in the vadose zone soil is controlled by gas phase humidity and soil particle size (Fig. 3). It is believed that water film formation on solid surfaces is needed for effective contaminant reduction and immobilization (Fig. 4). Molecular Dynamics (MD) Simulation is used to understand the mechanism of water film formation.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Apr 05 00:00:00 EDT 2006},
month = {Wed Apr 05 00:00:00 EDT 2006}
}

Conference:
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