skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Atmospheric NO2: in situ laser-induced fluorescence detection atparts per trillion mixing ratios

Abstract

NO2 affects the abundance of O3 and OH throughout theatmosphere, exerting influence over stratospheric ozone, on the oxidativecapacity of the atmosphere, on the greenhouse effect, on production oforganic and inorganic aerosol, and on production of photochemical smog.In the troposphere, NO2 mixing ratios vary from 100s of parts per billion(ppb) in cities to below 10 parts per trillion (ppt) in remote locations.We describe a laser-induced fluorescence instrument designed for accurate(+-5 percent, 1s), continuous, autonomous, in situ observations of NO2with the sensitivity (15 ppt/10 secat S/N=2) and portability necessary tostudy NO2 anywhere in the troposphere. The technique is advantageousbecause it is spectroscopically specific and direct in that it does notrequire conversion of NO2 into another species (e.g., NO) prior todetection eliminating a class of potential interferences. Performance ofthe instrument is illustrated with 15 weeks (July-Oct 1998) ofobservations at the University of California, Blodgett Forest fieldstation located in the foothills of the Sierra Nevada and 4 weeks (June15-July 15, 1999) in Nashville, TN during the Southern Oxidants Study.Ambient concentrations of NO2 at Blodgett Forest varied from below 50 pptto 4000 ppt and NO2 ranged from 5 to 50 percent of total reactivenitrogen, while in Nashville, TN concentrations ranged from 1 ppb to 75ppb.

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley NationalLaboratory, Berkeley, CA (US)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE; NASA, NOAAA Office of Global Programs
OSTI Identifier:
894391
Report Number(s):
LBNL-44344
R&D Project: 470038
DOE Contract Number:  
DE-AC02-05CH11231; NASA:NASI-99053; NA96-GP0482
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Analytical Chemistry
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 72; Journal Issue: 3; Related Information: Journal Publication Date: 2000
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
40

Citation Formats

Thornton, Joel A., Wooldridge, Paul J., and Cohen, Ronald C. Atmospheric NO2: in situ laser-induced fluorescence detection atparts per trillion mixing ratios. United States: N. p., 1999. Web.
Thornton, Joel A., Wooldridge, Paul J., & Cohen, Ronald C. Atmospheric NO2: in situ laser-induced fluorescence detection atparts per trillion mixing ratios. United States.
Thornton, Joel A., Wooldridge, Paul J., and Cohen, Ronald C. Wed . "Atmospheric NO2: in situ laser-induced fluorescence detection atparts per trillion mixing ratios". United States.
@article{osti_894391,
title = {Atmospheric NO2: in situ laser-induced fluorescence detection atparts per trillion mixing ratios},
author = {Thornton, Joel A. and Wooldridge, Paul J. and Cohen, Ronald C.},
abstractNote = {NO2 affects the abundance of O3 and OH throughout theatmosphere, exerting influence over stratospheric ozone, on the oxidativecapacity of the atmosphere, on the greenhouse effect, on production oforganic and inorganic aerosol, and on production of photochemical smog.In the troposphere, NO2 mixing ratios vary from 100s of parts per billion(ppb) in cities to below 10 parts per trillion (ppt) in remote locations.We describe a laser-induced fluorescence instrument designed for accurate(+-5 percent, 1s), continuous, autonomous, in situ observations of NO2with the sensitivity (15 ppt/10 secat S/N=2) and portability necessary tostudy NO2 anywhere in the troposphere. The technique is advantageousbecause it is spectroscopically specific and direct in that it does notrequire conversion of NO2 into another species (e.g., NO) prior todetection eliminating a class of potential interferences. Performance ofthe instrument is illustrated with 15 weeks (July-Oct 1998) ofobservations at the University of California, Blodgett Forest fieldstation located in the foothills of the Sierra Nevada and 4 weeks (June15-July 15, 1999) in Nashville, TN during the Southern Oxidants Study.Ambient concentrations of NO2 at Blodgett Forest varied from below 50 pptto 4000 ppt and NO2 ranged from 5 to 50 percent of total reactivenitrogen, while in Nashville, TN concentrations ranged from 1 ppb to 75ppb.},
doi = {},
journal = {Analytical Chemistry},
number = 3,
volume = 72,
place = {United States},
year = {1999},
month = {8}
}