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Title: Tri-modality small animal imaging system

Abstract

Our group is developing a scanner that combines x-ray, single gamma, and optical imaging on the same rotating gantry. Two functional modalities (SPECT and optical) are included because they have different strengths and weaknesses in terms of spatial and temporal decay lengths in the context of in vivo imaging, and because of the recent advent of multiple reporter gene constructs. The effect of attenuation by biological tissue on the detected intensity of the emitted signal was measured for both gamma and optical imaging. Attenuation by biological tissue was quantified for both the bioluminescent emission of luciferace and for the emission light of the near infrared fluorophore cyanine 5.5, using a fixed excitation light intensity. Experiments were performed to test the feasibility of using either single gamma or x-ray imaging to make depth-dependent corrections to the measured optical signal. Our results suggest that significant improvements in quantitation of optical emission are possible using straightforward correction techniques based on information from other modalities. Development of an integrated scanner in which data from each modality are obtained with the animal in a common configuration will greatly simplify this process.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE - Office of Energy Research (ER)
OSTI Identifier:
894193
Report Number(s):
JLAB-PHY-06-542; DOE/ER/40150-4084
Journal ID: ISSN 0018-9499; IETNAE; TRN: US200701%%155
DOE Contract Number:
AC05-06OR23177
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: IEEE Transactions on Nuclear Science; Journal Volume: 53; Journal Issue: 1
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; ANIMALS; ATTENUATION; CONFIGURATION; DECAY; EXCITATION; FUNCTIONALS; GENES; IN VIVO; SINGLE PHOTON EMISSION COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY

Citation Formats

Kundu, B.K., Stolin, A.V., Pole, J., Baumgart, L., Fontaine, M., Wojcik, R., Kross, B., Zorn, C., Majewski, S., and Williams, M.B. Tri-modality small animal imaging system. United States: N. p., 2006. Web. doi:10.1109/TNS.2005.862970.
Kundu, B.K., Stolin, A.V., Pole, J., Baumgart, L., Fontaine, M., Wojcik, R., Kross, B., Zorn, C., Majewski, S., & Williams, M.B. Tri-modality small animal imaging system. United States. doi:10.1109/TNS.2005.862970.
Kundu, B.K., Stolin, A.V., Pole, J., Baumgart, L., Fontaine, M., Wojcik, R., Kross, B., Zorn, C., Majewski, S., and Williams, M.B. Wed . "Tri-modality small animal imaging system". United States. doi:10.1109/TNS.2005.862970. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/894193.
@article{osti_894193,
title = {Tri-modality small animal imaging system},
author = {Kundu, B.K. and Stolin, A.V. and Pole, J. and Baumgart, L. and Fontaine, M. and Wojcik, R. and Kross, B. and Zorn, C. and Majewski, S. and Williams, M.B.},
abstractNote = {Our group is developing a scanner that combines x-ray, single gamma, and optical imaging on the same rotating gantry. Two functional modalities (SPECT and optical) are included because they have different strengths and weaknesses in terms of spatial and temporal decay lengths in the context of in vivo imaging, and because of the recent advent of multiple reporter gene constructs. The effect of attenuation by biological tissue on the detected intensity of the emitted signal was measured for both gamma and optical imaging. Attenuation by biological tissue was quantified for both the bioluminescent emission of luciferace and for the emission light of the near infrared fluorophore cyanine 5.5, using a fixed excitation light intensity. Experiments were performed to test the feasibility of using either single gamma or x-ray imaging to make depth-dependent corrections to the measured optical signal. Our results suggest that significant improvements in quantitation of optical emission are possible using straightforward correction techniques based on information from other modalities. Development of an integrated scanner in which data from each modality are obtained with the animal in a common configuration will greatly simplify this process.},
doi = {10.1109/TNS.2005.862970},
journal = {IEEE Transactions on Nuclear Science},
number = 1,
volume = 53,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Feb 01 00:00:00 EST 2006},
month = {Wed Feb 01 00:00:00 EST 2006}
}
  • The authors have developed a multimodality system for imaging the biodistribution of biologically interesting ligands tagged with /sup 125/I. By incorporating a small fluoroscope as an additional modality, they have enhanced their small animal nuclear imaging system to include both X-rays and images from two Hamamatsu R3292 5'' diameter position sensitive photomultiplier tubes (PSPMT) viewing pixelated scintillators with image co-registration of 1.5 mm or better. Collimators placed between the animal and the scintillators can easily be interchanged and include CuBe parallel-hole collimators with a range of resolution and sensitivity combinations. The small X-ray fluoroscope provides 5 cm diameter images, severalmore » of which can readily be combined to provide structural anatomical information from the animal under study. The system has been tested by comparing the uptake of /sup 125/I (in NaI) in control mice and mice previously fed a solution of KI (potassium iodide) designed specific.« less
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