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Title: A compact gamma camera for biological imaging

Abstract

A compact detector, sized particularly for imaging a mouse, is described. The active area of the detector is approximately 46 mm; spl times/ 96 mm. Two flat-panel Hamamatsu H8500 position-sensitive photomultiplier tubes (PSPMTs) are coupled to a pixellated NaI(Tl) scintillator which views the animal through a copper-beryllium (CuBe) parallel-hole collimator specially designed for {sup 125}I. Although the PSPMTs have insensitive areas at their edges and there is a physical gap, corrections for scintillation light collection at the junction between the two tubes results in a uniform response across the entire rectangular area of the detector. The system described has been developed to optimize both sensitivity and resolution for in-vivo imaging of small animals injected with iodinated compounds. We demonstrate an in-vivo application of this detector, particularly to SPECT, by imaging mice injected with approximately 10-15; spl mu/Ci of {sup 125}I.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE - Office of Energy Research (ER)
OSTI Identifier:
894180
Report Number(s):
JLAB-PHY-06-541; DOE/ER/40150-5003
Journal ID: ISSN 0018-9499; IETNAE; TRN: US0700007
DOE Contract Number:
AC05-84ER40150
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: IEEE Transactions on Nuclear Science; Journal Volume: 53; Journal Issue: 1
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
62 RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE; DESIGN; GAMMA CAMERAS; IN VIVO; MICE; RESOLUTION; SENSITIVITY; SINGLE PHOTON EMISSION COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY; IODINE 125

Citation Formats

Bradley, E L, Cella, J, Majewski, S, Popov, V, Qian, Jianguo, Saha, M S, Smith, M F, Weisenberger, A G, and Welsh, R E. A compact gamma camera for biological imaging. United States: N. p., 2006. Web. doi:10.1109/TNS.2005.862977.
Bradley, E L, Cella, J, Majewski, S, Popov, V, Qian, Jianguo, Saha, M S, Smith, M F, Weisenberger, A G, & Welsh, R E. A compact gamma camera for biological imaging. United States. doi:10.1109/TNS.2005.862977.
Bradley, E L, Cella, J, Majewski, S, Popov, V, Qian, Jianguo, Saha, M S, Smith, M F, Weisenberger, A G, and Welsh, R E. Wed . "A compact gamma camera for biological imaging". United States. doi:10.1109/TNS.2005.862977. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/894180.
@article{osti_894180,
title = {A compact gamma camera for biological imaging},
author = {Bradley, E L and Cella, J and Majewski, S and Popov, V and Qian, Jianguo and Saha, M S and Smith, M F and Weisenberger, A G and Welsh, R E},
abstractNote = {A compact detector, sized particularly for imaging a mouse, is described. The active area of the detector is approximately 46 mm; spl times/ 96 mm. Two flat-panel Hamamatsu H8500 position-sensitive photomultiplier tubes (PSPMTs) are coupled to a pixellated NaI(Tl) scintillator which views the animal through a copper-beryllium (CuBe) parallel-hole collimator specially designed for {sup 125}I. Although the PSPMTs have insensitive areas at their edges and there is a physical gap, corrections for scintillation light collection at the junction between the two tubes results in a uniform response across the entire rectangular area of the detector. The system described has been developed to optimize both sensitivity and resolution for in-vivo imaging of small animals injected with iodinated compounds. We demonstrate an in-vivo application of this detector, particularly to SPECT, by imaging mice injected with approximately 10-15; spl mu/Ci of {sup 125}I.},
doi = {10.1109/TNS.2005.862977},
journal = {IEEE Transactions on Nuclear Science},
number = 1,
volume = 53,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Feb 01 00:00:00 EST 2006},
month = {Wed Feb 01 00:00:00 EST 2006}
}
  • Introduction We describe a compact, portable dual-gamma camera system (named "MONICA" for MObile Nuclear Imaging CAmeras) for visualizing and analyzing the whole-body biodistribution of putative diagnostic and therapeutic single photon emitting radiotracers in animals the size of mice. Methods Two identical, miniature pixelated NaI(Tl) gamma cameras were fabricated and installed ?looking up? through the tabletop of a compact portable cart. Mice are placed directly on the tabletop for imaging. Camera imaging performance was evaluated with phantoms and field performance was evaluated in a weeklong In-111 imaging study performed in a mouse tumor xenograft model. Results Tc-99m performance measurements, using amore » photopeak energy window of 140 keV?10%, yielded the following results: spatial resolution (FWHM at 1 cm), 2.2 mm; sensitivity, 149 cps (counts per seconds)/MBq (5.5 cps/&#956;Ci); energy resolution (FWHM, full width at half maximum), 10.8%; count rate linearity (count rate vs. activity), r2=0.99 for 0?185 MBq (0?5 mCi) in the field of view (FOV); spatial uniformity, <3% count rate variation across the FOV. Tumor and whole-body distributions of the In-111 agent were well visualized in all animals in 5-min images acquired throughout the 168-h study period. Conclusion Performance measurements indicate that MONICA is well suited to whole-body single photon mouse imaging. The field study suggests that inter-device communications and user-oriented interfaces included in the MONICA design facilitate use of the system in practice. We believe that MONICA may be particularly useful early in the (cancer) drug development cycle where basic whole-body biodistribution data can direct future development of the agent under study and where logistical factors, e.g., limited imaging space, portability and, potentially, cost are important.« less
  • The authors report on the performance of two small field of view, compact gamma cameras working in single photon counting in planar imaging tests at 122 and 140 keV. The first camera is based on a LaBr{sub 3}:Ce scintillator continuous crystal (49x49x5 mm{sup 3}) assembled with a flat panel multianode photomultiplier tube with parallel readout. The second one belongs to the class of semiconductor hybrid pixel detectors, specifically, a CdTe pixel detector (14x14x1 mm{sup 3}) with 256x256 square pixels and a pitch of 55 {mu}m, read out by a CMOS single photon counting integrated circuit of the Medipix2 series. Themore » scintillation camera was operated with selectable energy window while the CdTe camera was operated with a single low-energy detection threshold of about 20 keV, i.e., without energy discrimination. The detectors were coupled to pinhole or parallel-hole high-resolution collimators. The evaluation of their overall performance in basic imaging tasks is presented through measurements of their detection efficiency, intrinsic spatial resolution, noise, image SNR, and contrast recovery. The scintillation and CdTe cameras showed, respectively, detection efficiencies at 122 keV of 83% and 45%, intrinsic spatial resolutions of 0.9 mm and 75 {mu}m, and total background noises of 40.5 and 1.6 cps. Imaging tests with high-resolution parallel-hole and pinhole collimators are also reported.« less
  • Purpose: The authors assembled a prototype compact gamma-ray imaging probe (MediPROBE) for sentinel lymph node (SLN) localization. This probe is based on a semiconductor pixel detector. Its basic performance was assessed in the laboratory and clinically in comparison with a conventional gamma camera. Methods: The room-temperature CdTe pixel detector (1 mm thick) has 256x256 square pixels arranged with a 55 {mu}m pitch (sensitive area 14.08x14.08 mm{sup 2}), coupled pixel-by-pixel via bump-bonding to the Medipix2 photon-counting readout CMOS integrated circuit. The imaging probe is equipped with a set of three interchangeable knife-edge pinhole collimators (0.94, 1.2, or 2.1 mm effective diametermore » at 140 keV) and its focal distance can be regulated in order to set a given field of view (FOV). A typical FOV of 70 mm at 50 mm skin-to-collimator distance corresponds to a minification factor 1:5. The detector is operated at a single low-energy threshold of about 20 keV. Results: For {sup 99m}Tc, at 50 mm distance, a background-subtracted sensitivity of 6.5x10{sup -3} cps/kBq and a system spatial resolution of 5.5 mm FWHM were obtained for the 0.94 mm pinhole; corresponding values for the 2.1 mm pinhole were 3.3x10{sup -2} cps/kBq and 12.6 mm. The dark count rate was 0.71 cps. Clinical images in three patients with melanoma indicate detection of the SLNs with acquisition times between 60 and 410 s with an injected activity of 26 MBq {sup 99m}Tc and prior localization with standard gamma camera lymphoscintigraphy. Conclusions: The laboratory performance of this imaging probe is limited by the pinhole collimator performance and the necessity of working in minification due to the limited detector size. However, in clinical operative conditions, the CdTe imaging probe was effective in detecting SLNs with adequate resolution and an acceptable sensitivity. Sensitivity is expected to improve with the future availability of a larger CdTe detector permitting operation at shorter distances from the patient skin.« less
  • No abstract prepared.
  • The development of a hand-held {gamma} imaging probe for inside body localization of small tumors is of first interest for radio-guided operative cancer surgery. In that context, the authors have developed a sub-millimeter spatial resolution, small field of view, {gamma} per-operative compact imager (POCI). It consists of a head module composed of a high resolution tungsten collimator and a YAP:Ce crystal plate, optically coupled to an intensified position sensitive diode (IPSD). The authors report here the essential imaging performance characteristics of the POCI camera (spatial resolution, position linearity, efficiency and energy response). These were obtained by studying the influence ofmore » the collimator and the crystal design to evaluate the optimal configuration. The present version of POCI has a 24 mm diameter usable field of view and an intrinsic spatial resolution of 0.9 mm to 1.2 mm FWHM at 120 keV. These good detection performance characteristics combined with the small size of the camera make the device well suited to provide intra-operative monitoring in several medical procedures, such as thyroid and breast tumor removal.« less