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Title: T-REX Design Considerations for Detection of Concealed 238U

Abstract

Here they outline considerations that might inform choices for the design of a laser/linac-based light source used to detect {sup 238}U via excitation of the resonance at 680.11 keV in this isotope. They assume that the principal concern is speed of interrogation and not, e.g., how much radiological dose is imparted during a scan. It is found that if the photon detectors used in the system have an energy resolution better than or comparable to that of the interrogation beam, then to a first approximation the light source should be designed to have the highest possible specific fluence (photons per unit energy per unit time). there is also a weak dependence of scan time on the number of photons emitted per pulse of the light source. A simple formula describing the tradeoff between specific fluence and number of photons per pulse is presented.

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
893990
Report Number(s):
UCRL-TR-219071
TRN: US0700017
DOE Contract Number:
W-7405-ENG-48
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
42 ENGINEERING; 72 PHYSICS OF ELEMENTARY PARTICLES AND FIELDS; 73 NUCLEAR PHYSICS AND RADIATION PHYSICS; DESIGN; DETECTION; ENERGY RESOLUTION; EXCITATION; LIGHT SOURCES; PHOTONS; RESONANCE; VELOCITY

Citation Formats

Pruet, J, and McNabb, D P. T-REX Design Considerations for Detection of Concealed 238U. United States: N. p., 2006. Web. doi:10.2172/893990.
Pruet, J, & McNabb, D P. T-REX Design Considerations for Detection of Concealed 238U. United States. doi:10.2172/893990.
Pruet, J, and McNabb, D P. Tue . "T-REX Design Considerations for Detection of Concealed 238U". United States. doi:10.2172/893990. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/893990.
@article{osti_893990,
title = {T-REX Design Considerations for Detection of Concealed 238U},
author = {Pruet, J and McNabb, D P},
abstractNote = {Here they outline considerations that might inform choices for the design of a laser/linac-based light source used to detect {sup 238}U via excitation of the resonance at 680.11 keV in this isotope. They assume that the principal concern is speed of interrogation and not, e.g., how much radiological dose is imparted during a scan. It is found that if the photon detectors used in the system have an energy resolution better than or comparable to that of the interrogation beam, then to a first approximation the light source should be designed to have the highest possible specific fluence (photons per unit energy per unit time). there is also a weak dependence of scan time on the number of photons emitted per pulse of the light source. A simple formula describing the tradeoff between specific fluence and number of photons per pulse is presented.},
doi = {10.2172/893990},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Feb 07 00:00:00 EST 2006},
month = {Tue Feb 07 00:00:00 EST 2006}
}

Technical Report:

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