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Title: A Science-Based Approach to Understanding Waste Form Durability in Open and Closed Nuclear Fuel Cycles

Abstract

There are two compelling reasons for understanding source term and near-field processes in a radioactive waste geologic repository. First, almost all of the radioactivity is initially in the waste form, mainly in the spent nuclear fuel (SNF) or nuclear waste glass. Second, over long periods, after the engineered barriers are degraded, the waste form is a primary control on the release of radioactivity. Thus, it is essential to know the physical and chemical state of the waste form after hundreds of thousands of years. The United States Department of Energy's Yucca Mountain Repository Program has initiated a long-term program to develop a basic understanding of the fundamental mechanisms of radionuclide release and a quantification of the release as repository conditions evolve over time. Specifically, the research program addresses four critical areas: (a) SNF dissolution mechanisms and rates; (b) formation and properties of U{sup 6+}-secondary phases; (c) waste form-waste package interactions in the near-field; and (d) integration of in-package chemical and physical processes. The ultimate goal is to integrate the scientific results into a larger scale model of source term and near-field processes. This integrated model will be used to provide a basis for understanding the behavior of the source termmore » over long time periods (greater than 10{sup 5} years). Such a fundamental and integrated experimental and modeling approach to source term processes can also be readily applied to development of advanced waste forms as part of a closed nuclear fuel cycle. Specifically, a fundamental understanding of candidate waste form materials stability in high temperature/high radiation environments and near-field geochemical/hydrologic processes could enable development of advanced waste forms ''tailored'' to specific geologic settings.« less

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Yucca Mountain Project, Las Vegas, Nevada
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
893887
Report Number(s):
NA
MOL.20060815.0149, DC# 48139; TRN: US0606182
DOE Contract Number:  
NA
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
12 MANAGEMENT OF RADIOACTIVE WASTES, AND NON-RADIOACTIVE WASTES FROM NUCLEAR FACILITIES; 11 NUCLEAR FUEL CYCLE AND FUEL MATERIALS; CHEMICAL STATE; DISSOLUTION; GLASS; NUCLEAR FUELS; RADIATIONS; RADIOACTIVE WASTES; RADIOACTIVITY; RADIOISOTOPES; RESEARCH PROGRAMS; SCALE MODELS; SOURCE TERMS; WASTE FORMS; WASTES; YUCCA MOUNTAIN; SPENT FUELS

Citation Formats

M.T. Peters, and R.C. Ewing. A Science-Based Approach to Understanding Waste Form Durability in Open and Closed Nuclear Fuel Cycles. United States: N. p., 2006. Web.
M.T. Peters, & R.C. Ewing. A Science-Based Approach to Understanding Waste Form Durability in Open and Closed Nuclear Fuel Cycles. United States.
M.T. Peters, and R.C. Ewing. Thu . "A Science-Based Approach to Understanding Waste Form Durability in Open and Closed Nuclear Fuel Cycles". United States. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/893887.
@article{osti_893887,
title = {A Science-Based Approach to Understanding Waste Form Durability in Open and Closed Nuclear Fuel Cycles},
author = {M.T. Peters and R.C. Ewing},
abstractNote = {There are two compelling reasons for understanding source term and near-field processes in a radioactive waste geologic repository. First, almost all of the radioactivity is initially in the waste form, mainly in the spent nuclear fuel (SNF) or nuclear waste glass. Second, over long periods, after the engineered barriers are degraded, the waste form is a primary control on the release of radioactivity. Thus, it is essential to know the physical and chemical state of the waste form after hundreds of thousands of years. The United States Department of Energy's Yucca Mountain Repository Program has initiated a long-term program to develop a basic understanding of the fundamental mechanisms of radionuclide release and a quantification of the release as repository conditions evolve over time. Specifically, the research program addresses four critical areas: (a) SNF dissolution mechanisms and rates; (b) formation and properties of U{sup 6+}-secondary phases; (c) waste form-waste package interactions in the near-field; and (d) integration of in-package chemical and physical processes. The ultimate goal is to integrate the scientific results into a larger scale model of source term and near-field processes. This integrated model will be used to provide a basis for understanding the behavior of the source term over long time periods (greater than 10{sup 5} years). Such a fundamental and integrated experimental and modeling approach to source term processes can also be readily applied to development of advanced waste forms as part of a closed nuclear fuel cycle. Specifically, a fundamental understanding of candidate waste form materials stability in high temperature/high radiation environments and near-field geochemical/hydrologic processes could enable development of advanced waste forms ''tailored'' to specific geologic settings.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2006},
month = {6}
}