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Title: OPERATION OF A PUBLIC GEOLOGIC CORE AND SAMPLE REPOSITORY IN HOUSTION, TEXAS

Abstract

The Bureau of Economic Geology's Houston Research Center (HRC) is well established as a premier regional research center for geologic research serving not only Houston, but geoscientists from around Texas, the US, and even the world. As reported in the 2004-2005 technical progress report to the DOE, the HRC provides a state-of-the-art core viewing facility, two fully equipped conference rooms, and a comprehensive technical library, all available for public use. In addition, the HRC currently now houses over 600,000 boxes of rock material, and has space to hold approximately 300,000 more boxes. Use of the facility has remained strong during this fourth year of operation; the number of patrons averaged nearly 150 per month from June 1, to 2005 May 31, 2006. This usage is a combination of individuals describing core, groups of geoscientists holding seminars and workshops, and various industry and government-funded groups holding short courses, workshops, and seminars. These numbers are in addition to the numerous daily requests from patrons desiring to have rock material shipped offsite to their own offices. The BEG/HRC secured several substantial donations of rock materials and cash totaling approximately $2.2 million during the 2005-2006 operating period. All of these funds went directly into an endowment that will, when complete, endow the HRC in perpetuity. Specific details regarding the funds in the endowment are addressed in a table later in this report. Outreach during 2005 and 2006 included many technical presentations and several publications on the HRC. Several field trips to the facility were held for geoscience professionals and grade school students alike. Goals for the upcoming year include securing donations of rock material and cash to approach full funding of the HRC endowment. Thanks to donations totaling $2.2 million from Shea Homes (heritage Unocal rock material), Chevron and others this operating year, the HRC endowment now totals $8,015,621. A major project underway for the HRC in FY2007 is improvement of the existing online core/log database into a Geoinformatics-compatible, GIS-driven online system. Usage of the HRC has gone up every year and is now very respectable. This year we will strive to raise awareness of the HRC's 100,000-volume geoscience technical library. Our original business model targeted $10 million in endowment; after several years of operation we realize we require an $11 million endowment. We are ''on plan'' and need only $$3 million to fully fund the endowment. To meet these goals in the 2006-2007 operating year will require DOE support for the fifth and final year. DOE support will allow for {approx}$$600k in endowment growth and save using the fund for operation; lack of support will result in a net negative spread of up to $1 million, and set the plan way back. We recognize that DOE budgets for oil and gas research, against best efforts, have been cut substantially this year. Any support available for HRC operation, during continuing resolution or otherwise, would have a very positive impact on this critical final year of the original business plan.

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
University Of Texas
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
893366
DOE Contract Number:
FG26-02NT15290
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
58 GEOSCIENCES; 02 PETROLEUM; TEXAS; INFORMATION SYSTEMS; DRILL CORES; RESERVOIR ROCK; EDUCATIONAL FACILITIES; GEOLOGY

Citation Formats

Scott W. Tinker, and Beverly Blakeney DeJarnett. OPERATION OF A PUBLIC GEOLOGIC CORE AND SAMPLE REPOSITORY IN HOUSTION, TEXAS. United States: N. p., 2006. Web. doi:10.2172/893366.
Scott W. Tinker, & Beverly Blakeney DeJarnett. OPERATION OF A PUBLIC GEOLOGIC CORE AND SAMPLE REPOSITORY IN HOUSTION, TEXAS. United States. doi:10.2172/893366.
Scott W. Tinker, and Beverly Blakeney DeJarnett. Fri . "OPERATION OF A PUBLIC GEOLOGIC CORE AND SAMPLE REPOSITORY IN HOUSTION, TEXAS". United States. doi:10.2172/893366. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/893366.
@article{osti_893366,
title = {OPERATION OF A PUBLIC GEOLOGIC CORE AND SAMPLE REPOSITORY IN HOUSTION, TEXAS},
author = {Scott W. Tinker and Beverly Blakeney DeJarnett},
abstractNote = {The Bureau of Economic Geology's Houston Research Center (HRC) is well established as a premier regional research center for geologic research serving not only Houston, but geoscientists from around Texas, the US, and even the world. As reported in the 2004-2005 technical progress report to the DOE, the HRC provides a state-of-the-art core viewing facility, two fully equipped conference rooms, and a comprehensive technical library, all available for public use. In addition, the HRC currently now houses over 600,000 boxes of rock material, and has space to hold approximately 300,000 more boxes. Use of the facility has remained strong during this fourth year of operation; the number of patrons averaged nearly 150 per month from June 1, to 2005 May 31, 2006. This usage is a combination of individuals describing core, groups of geoscientists holding seminars and workshops, and various industry and government-funded groups holding short courses, workshops, and seminars. These numbers are in addition to the numerous daily requests from patrons desiring to have rock material shipped offsite to their own offices. The BEG/HRC secured several substantial donations of rock materials and cash totaling approximately $2.2 million during the 2005-2006 operating period. All of these funds went directly into an endowment that will, when complete, endow the HRC in perpetuity. Specific details regarding the funds in the endowment are addressed in a table later in this report. Outreach during 2005 and 2006 included many technical presentations and several publications on the HRC. Several field trips to the facility were held for geoscience professionals and grade school students alike. Goals for the upcoming year include securing donations of rock material and cash to approach full funding of the HRC endowment. Thanks to donations totaling $2.2 million from Shea Homes (heritage Unocal rock material), Chevron and others this operating year, the HRC endowment now totals $8,015,621. A major project underway for the HRC in FY2007 is improvement of the existing online core/log database into a Geoinformatics-compatible, GIS-driven online system. Usage of the HRC has gone up every year and is now very respectable. This year we will strive to raise awareness of the HRC's 100,000-volume geoscience technical library. Our original business model targeted $10 million in endowment; after several years of operation we realize we require an $11 million endowment. We are ''on plan'' and need only $3 million to fully fund the endowment. To meet these goals in the 2006-2007 operating year will require DOE support for the fifth and final year. DOE support will allow for {approx}$600k in endowment growth and save using the fund for operation; lack of support will result in a net negative spread of up to $1 million, and set the plan way back. We recognize that DOE budgets for oil and gas research, against best efforts, have been cut substantially this year. Any support available for HRC operation, during continuing resolution or otherwise, would have a very positive impact on this critical final year of the original business plan.},
doi = {10.2172/893366},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Apr 14 00:00:00 EDT 2006},
month = {Fri Apr 14 00:00:00 EDT 2006}
}

Technical Report:

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  • In the spring of 2002, the Department of Energy provided an initial 1-year grant to the Bureau of Economic Geology (BEG) at The University of Texas at Austin (UT). The grant covered the one-year operational expenses of a worldclass core and cuttings facility located in Houston, Texas, that BP America donated to the BEG. The DOE investment of $300,000, matched by a $75,000 UT contribution, provided critical first-year funds that were heavily leveraged by the BP gift of $7.0 million in facilities and cash. DOE also provided a one-month extension and grant of $30,000 for the month of May 2003.more » A 5-year plan to grow a permanent endowment in order to manage the facility in perpetuity is well under way and on schedule. The facility, named the Houston Research Center, represents an ideal model for a strong Federal, university, and private partnership to accomplish a national good. This report summarizes the activities supported by the initial DOE grant during the first 13 months of operation and provides insight into the activities and needs of the facility in the second year of operation.« less
  • The Bureau of Economic Geology (BEG), building on an initial gift from BP, and with the continuing support of the Department of Energy (DOE), has established the first regional core and sample research center in Houston, Texas. The Houston Research Center (HRC) provides a state-of-the-art core layout facility, two fully equipped meeting rooms, and a comprehensive technical library, all available for public use. This document summarizes the activities, upkeep, increase in staff, and public impact on industry and the community that were accomplished at the Houston Research Center during its first two years of operation.
  • The Bureau of Economic Geology's Houston Research Center (HRC) is well established as a premier regional research center for geologic research serving not only Houston, but geoscientists from around Texas, the U. S., and even the world. As reported in the 2003-2004 technical progress report to the DOE, the HRC provides a state-of-the-art core viewing facility, two fully equipped conference rooms, and a comprehensive technical library, all available for public use. In addition, the HRC currently houses over 500,000 boxes of rock material, and has space to hold approximately 400,000 more boxes. Use of the facility has continued to increasemore » during this third year of operation; over the past twelve months the HRC has averaged approximately 200 patrons per month. This usage is a combination of individuals describing core, groups of geoscientists holding seminars and workshops, and various industry and government-funded groups holding short courses, workshops, and seminars. The BEG/HRC secured several substantial donations of rock materials and/or cash during this operating period. All of these funds went directly into the endowment. Outreach during 2004 and 2005 included many technical presentations and several publications on the HRC. Several field trips to the facility were held for geoscience professionals and grade school students alike. Goals for the upcoming year involve securing more donations of rock material and cash in order to fully fund the HRC endowment. BEG will also continue to increase the number of patrons using the facility, and we will strive to raise awareness of the HRC's 100,000-volume geoscience technical library.« less
  • The Bureau of Economic Geology's Houston Research Center (HRC) is well established as a premier regional research center for geologic research serving not only Houston, but geoscientists from around Texas, the U. S., and even the world. As reported in the FY05 and FY06 technical progress reports to the DOE, the HRC provides a state-of-the-art core viewing facility, two fully equipped conference rooms, and a comprehensive technical library, all available for public use. In addition, the HRC currently now houses over 725,000 boxes of rock material (as of January 2008), and has space to hold approximately 300,000 more boxes. Use of the facility has remained strong; the number of patrons averaged over 100 per month from June 1, 2006 to October 2007, and 90,000 boxes of core were donated to, and received by, the HRC during this time. Usage is a combination of individuals describing core, groups of geoscientists holding seminars and workshops, and various industry and government-funded groups holding short courses, workshops, and seminars. These numbers are in addition to the numerous daily requests from patrons desiring to have rock material shipped offsite to their own offices. The BEG/HRC secured several substantial donations of rock materials and cash totaling approximatelymore » $2.2 million during the 2005-2006 operating period. All of these funds went directly into an endowment that UT is building in order to operate the HRC primarily off a portion of the interest generated by the fund. Specific details regarding the funds in the endowment are addressed in a table later in this report. Outreach during 2005 and 2006 included many technical presentations and several publications on the HRC. Several field trips to the facility were held for geoscience professionals and grade school students alike. Goals for the upcoming year involve securing a major donation of rock material and cash in order to approach full funding of the HRC endowment. Thanks to donations totaling $2.2 million from Shea Homes (heritage Unocal rock material),Chevron and others this operating year, the HRC endowment now totals $8,015,621. A major project underway for the HRC in FY2007 is improvement of the existing online core/log database into a geoinformatics-compatible, GIS-driven online system. Usage of the HRC has gone up every year and is now very respectable. This year we will strive to raise awareness of the HRC's 100,000-volume geoscience technical library. Our original business model targeted $10 million in endowment; after several years of operation we realize we require an $11 million endowment. We are 'on plan' and need only $$3 million to fully fund the endowment. To meet these goals in the 2007 operating year will require DOE support for the fifth and final year. DOW support will allow for {approx}$$600K in endowment growth and save using the fund for operation; lack of support will result in a net negative spread of up to $1 million, and set the plan way back. We recognize that DOE budgets for oil and gas research, against best efforts, have been cut substantially this year. Any support available for HRC operation, during continuing resolution or otherwise, would have a very positive impact on this critical final year of the original business plan.« less
  • Shell Oil Company donated its proprietary core and sample repository to the Bureau of Economic Geology, The University of Texas at Austin, in 1994. This collection of geologic materials is composed of 325,000 boxes of rocks and samples housed in a 32,700-ft{sup 2} warehouse in Midland, Texas. The material includes cores from more than 3,000 wells (75,000 boxes) and cuttings from more than 90,000 wells (260,000 boxes). In addition to the warehouse space, the repository consists of layout rooms, a processing room, and office space. The U.S. Department of Energy provided $375,000 under Grant Number DE-FG22-94BC14854 for organizing the collection,more » staffing the facility, and making the material available to the public for the first 5 years of operation. Shell Oil Company provided an endowment of $1.3 million to cover the cost of operating the facility after the fifth year of operation.« less