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Title: Calcium Impurities in Enhanced-Depletion-Width GaInNAs Grown by Molecular-Beam Epitaxy

Abstract

No abstract prepared.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
893073
DOE Contract Number:
AC36-99-GO10337
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Journal of Vacuum Science and Technology. A, Vacuum, Surfaces, and Films; Journal Issue: 3, May/June 2006
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
14 SOLAR ENERGY; 36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; CALCIUM; EPITAXY; IMPURITIES; Solar Energy - Photovoltaics

Citation Formats

Ptak, A. J., Friedman, D. J., Kurtz, S., Reedy, R. C., Young, M., Jackrel, D. B., Yuen, H. B., Bank, S. R., Wistey, M. A., and Harris Jr., J. S.. Calcium Impurities in Enhanced-Depletion-Width GaInNAs Grown by Molecular-Beam Epitaxy. United States: N. p., 2006. Web. doi:10.1116/1.2190664.
Ptak, A. J., Friedman, D. J., Kurtz, S., Reedy, R. C., Young, M., Jackrel, D. B., Yuen, H. B., Bank, S. R., Wistey, M. A., & Harris Jr., J. S.. Calcium Impurities in Enhanced-Depletion-Width GaInNAs Grown by Molecular-Beam Epitaxy. United States. doi:10.1116/1.2190664.
Ptak, A. J., Friedman, D. J., Kurtz, S., Reedy, R. C., Young, M., Jackrel, D. B., Yuen, H. B., Bank, S. R., Wistey, M. A., and Harris Jr., J. S.. Mon . "Calcium Impurities in Enhanced-Depletion-Width GaInNAs Grown by Molecular-Beam Epitaxy". United States. doi:10.1116/1.2190664.
@article{osti_893073,
title = {Calcium Impurities in Enhanced-Depletion-Width GaInNAs Grown by Molecular-Beam Epitaxy},
author = {Ptak, A. J. and Friedman, D. J. and Kurtz, S. and Reedy, R. C. and Young, M. and Jackrel, D. B. and Yuen, H. B. and Bank, S. R. and Wistey, M. A. and Harris Jr., J. S.},
abstractNote = {No abstract prepared.},
doi = {10.1116/1.2190664},
journal = {Journal of Vacuum Science and Technology. A, Vacuum, Surfaces, and Films},
number = 3, May/June 2006,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon May 01 00:00:00 EDT 2006},
month = {Mon May 01 00:00:00 EDT 2006}
}
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