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Title: Joint inversion of geophysical and hydrological data for improvedsubsurface characterization

Abstract

Understanding fluid distribution and movement in the subsurface is critical for a variety of subsurface applications, such as remediation of environmental contaminants, sequestration of nuclear waste and CO2, intrusion of saline water into fresh water aquifers, and the production of oil and gas. It is well recognized that characterizing the properties that control fluids in the subsurface with the accuracy and spatial coverage needed to parameterize flow and transport models is challenging using conventional borehole data alone. Integration of conventional borehole data with more spatially extensive geophysical data (obtained from the surface, between boreholes, and from surface to boreholes) shows promise for providing quantitative information about subsurface properties and processes. Typically, estimation of subsurface properties involves a two-step procedure in which geophysical data are first inverted and then integrated with direct measurements and petrophysical relationship information to estimate hydrological parameters. However, errors inherent to geophysical data acquisition and inversion approaches and errors associated with petrophysical relationships can decrease the value of geophysical data in the estimation procedure. In this paper, we illustrate using two examples how joint inversion approaches, or simultaneous inversion of geophysical and hydrological data, offer great potential for overcoming some of these limitations.

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley NationalLaboratory, Berkeley, CA (US)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Director. Office of Science. Office of Biological andEnvironmental Research. Environmental Remediation Sciences Division,Laboratory Directed Research and Development
OSTI Identifier:
891633
Report Number(s):
LBNL-59995
R&D Project: G45201; BnR: KP1302000; TRN: US0605455
DOE Contract Number:  
DE-AC02-05CH11231
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
The Leading Edge
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 25; Journal Issue: 6; Related Information: Journal Publication Date: 06/2006
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
12 MANAGEMENT OF RADIOACTIVE WASTES, AND NON-RADIOACTIVE WASTES FROM NUCLEAR FACILITIES; 58 GEOSCIENCES; ACCURACY; AQUIFERS; BOREHOLES; DATA ACQUISITION; DISTRIBUTION; FRESH WATER; PRODUCTION; RADIOACTIVE WASTES; TRANSPORT; WATER; Hydrogeophysics geophysics joint inversion characterizationpetrophysics prediction remediation

Citation Formats

Kowalsky, Michael B., Chen, Jinsong, and Hubbard, Susan S. Joint inversion of geophysical and hydrological data for improvedsubsurface characterization. United States: N. p., 2006. Web. doi:10.1190/1.2210057.
Kowalsky, Michael B., Chen, Jinsong, & Hubbard, Susan S. Joint inversion of geophysical and hydrological data for improvedsubsurface characterization. United States. doi:10.1190/1.2210057.
Kowalsky, Michael B., Chen, Jinsong, and Hubbard, Susan S. Mon . "Joint inversion of geophysical and hydrological data for improvedsubsurface characterization". United States. doi:10.1190/1.2210057. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/891633.
@article{osti_891633,
title = {Joint inversion of geophysical and hydrological data for improvedsubsurface characterization},
author = {Kowalsky, Michael B. and Chen, Jinsong and Hubbard, Susan S.},
abstractNote = {Understanding fluid distribution and movement in the subsurface is critical for a variety of subsurface applications, such as remediation of environmental contaminants, sequestration of nuclear waste and CO2, intrusion of saline water into fresh water aquifers, and the production of oil and gas. It is well recognized that characterizing the properties that control fluids in the subsurface with the accuracy and spatial coverage needed to parameterize flow and transport models is challenging using conventional borehole data alone. Integration of conventional borehole data with more spatially extensive geophysical data (obtained from the surface, between boreholes, and from surface to boreholes) shows promise for providing quantitative information about subsurface properties and processes. Typically, estimation of subsurface properties involves a two-step procedure in which geophysical data are first inverted and then integrated with direct measurements and petrophysical relationship information to estimate hydrological parameters. However, errors inherent to geophysical data acquisition and inversion approaches and errors associated with petrophysical relationships can decrease the value of geophysical data in the estimation procedure. In this paper, we illustrate using two examples how joint inversion approaches, or simultaneous inversion of geophysical and hydrological data, offer great potential for overcoming some of these limitations.},
doi = {10.1190/1.2210057},
journal = {The Leading Edge},
number = 6,
volume = 25,
place = {United States},
year = {2006},
month = {4}
}