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Title: THE 10,000 YEAR PLAN

Abstract

Pharkya, a Ph.D. candidate in materials science and engineering, works in the area of corrosion science, predicting how materials will perform over extended periods of time. Her particular focus is a nickel-chromium-molybdenum alloy called C-22, a highly corrosion-resistant metal. Pharkya's aim is to help determine whether containers made from C-22 can be used to store high-energy nuclear waste--for 10,000 years and longer. Pharkya's work is part of a plan by the U.S. Department of Energy to consolidate the country's nuclear waste in a single proposed repository. The proposed repository is in Yucca Mountain located in a remote Nevada desert. Currently about 70,000 metric tons of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste are divided between approximately 100 sites around the country. The undertaking, Pharkya emphasizes, is massive. To study just the corrosion aspects of the packaging, Case is collaborating with eight other universities, five national labs and Atomic Energy of Canada Limited. Even with so many players, the study will likely take several years to complete. Heading the entire group is Joe Payer, a professor of materials science and engineering at Case and Pharkya's mentor. ''I came here to have the opportunity to work with Dr. Payer, an expert inmore » corrosion, but I didn't know specifically what I would be working on'', Pharkya recalls. ''I was pretty thrilled when I learned about the vastness of the project--my research would be just a small part of this huge topic--and the impact of the research we would be doing''.« less

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Yucca Mountain Project, Las Vegas, Nevada
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
891581
Report Number(s):
46982
TRN: US0605449
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: SPRING 2006 EDITION OF CASE MAGAZINE
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
12 MANAGEMENT OF RADIOACTIVE WASTES, AND NON-RADIOACTIVE WASTES FROM NUCLEAR FACILITIES; 11 NUCLEAR FUEL CYCLE AND FUEL MATERIALS; 29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY AND ECONOMY; ALLOYS; CANADA; CONTAINERS; CORROSION; HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTES; METRICS; NEVADA; NUCLEAR ENERGY; NUCLEAR FUELS; PACKAGING; RADIOACTIVE WASTES; YUCCA MOUNTAIN; SPENT FUELS

Citation Formats

L. Srisuro. THE 10,000 YEAR PLAN. United States: N. p., 2006. Web.
L. Srisuro. THE 10,000 YEAR PLAN. United States.
L. Srisuro. Fri . "THE 10,000 YEAR PLAN". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/891581.
@article{osti_891581,
title = {THE 10,000 YEAR PLAN},
author = {L. Srisuro},
abstractNote = {Pharkya, a Ph.D. candidate in materials science and engineering, works in the area of corrosion science, predicting how materials will perform over extended periods of time. Her particular focus is a nickel-chromium-molybdenum alloy called C-22, a highly corrosion-resistant metal. Pharkya's aim is to help determine whether containers made from C-22 can be used to store high-energy nuclear waste--for 10,000 years and longer. Pharkya's work is part of a plan by the U.S. Department of Energy to consolidate the country's nuclear waste in a single proposed repository. The proposed repository is in Yucca Mountain located in a remote Nevada desert. Currently about 70,000 metric tons of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste are divided between approximately 100 sites around the country. The undertaking, Pharkya emphasizes, is massive. To study just the corrosion aspects of the packaging, Case is collaborating with eight other universities, five national labs and Atomic Energy of Canada Limited. Even with so many players, the study will likely take several years to complete. Heading the entire group is Joe Payer, a professor of materials science and engineering at Case and Pharkya's mentor. ''I came here to have the opportunity to work with Dr. Payer, an expert in corrosion, but I didn't know specifically what I would be working on'', Pharkya recalls. ''I was pretty thrilled when I learned about the vastness of the project--my research would be just a small part of this huge topic--and the impact of the research we would be doing''.},
doi = {},
journal = {SPRING 2006 EDITION OF CASE MAGAZINE},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Feb 10 00:00:00 EST 2006},
month = {Fri Feb 10 00:00:00 EST 2006}
}
  • Pallavi Pharkya thinks a lot about the future. Pharkya, a Ph.D. candidate in materials science and engineering, works in the area of corrosion science, predicting how materials will perform over extended periods of time. Her particular focus is a nickel-chromium-molybdenum alloy called C-22, a highly corrosion-resistant metal. Pharkya's aim is to help determine whether containers made from C-22 can be used to store high-energy nuclear waste--for 10,000 years and longer. Pharkya's work is part of a plan by the U.S. Department of Energy to consolidate the country's nuclear waste in a single proposed repository. The proposed repository is in Yuccamore » Mountain located in a remote Nevada desert. Currently about 70,000 metric tons of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste are divided between approximately 100 sites around the country. The undertaking, Pharkya emphasizes, is massive. To study just the corrosion aspects of the packaging, Case is collaborating with eight other universities, five national labs and Atomic Energy of Canada Limited. Even with so many players, the study will likely take several years to complete. Heading the entire group is Joe Payer, a professor of materials science and engineering at Case and Pharkya's mentor. ''I came here to have the opportunity to work with Dr. Payer, an expert in corrosion, but I didn't know specifically what I would be working on'', Pharkya recalls. ''I was pretty thrilled when I learned about the vastness of the project--my research would be just a small part of this huge topic--and the impact of the research we would be doing''.« less
  • Sensitive high angular resolution ({approx}2'') CO(2-1) line observations made with the Submillimeter Array of the flow emanating from the high-mass star-forming region DR21 located in the Cygnus X molecular cloud are presented. These new interferometric observations indicate that this well known enigmatic outflow appears to have been produced by an explosive event that took place about 10,000 years ago, and that might be related to the disintegration of a massive stellar system such as the one that occurred in Orion Becklin-Neugebauer/Kleinman-Low 500 years ago, but about 20 times more energetic. This result therefore argues in favor of the idea thatmore » the disintegration of young stellar systems perhaps is a frequent phenomenon present during the formation of massive stars. However, many more theoretical and observational studies are still needed to confirm our hypothesis.« less
  • The volume of coke production rose by 2.4% over 1976. The new batteries have dry coke-quenching units, coal preparation shops and shops for recovery and processing of coke chemical products. In the past year a great deal of new equipment was installed at coke plants. For example, a large number of standpipes were obtained with mechanized control of all their service operations. There was widespread adoption of varous systems for automatic control of coke loading into the charging car. The Moscow Coke Gas Works is successfully using a system for automatic remote control of the electric drives from a singlemore » control panel. Rather good resuls were obtained with automatically remote-controlled coal-charging cars at the Yasinovka Coke Works and with the large-capacity batteries of the Cherepovets I and SW. Operations were developed for charging the hoppers with the coal charge, including selection of the row of coal tower bins, stopping of the car, loading of the charge into the ovens (including selection of the oven to be charged) and servicing the standpipes of the ovens to be pushed. Emission-free charging became a necessary element of coking technology. In the current year the coking industry should develop still more rapidly. Measures must be taken to provide construction workers with refractory materials, equipment and the necessary technical documentaton, and progress in construction should be constantly monitored. All the new coke batteries are high-capacity batteries, with productivity of 1.0 million ton/y each. These batteries will become standard, marking the beginning of a qualitatively new stage in the development of coke ovens, servicing of equipment, mechanization of laborious operations, and automation of production processes.« less