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Title: On the fracture of human dentin: Is it stress- orstrain-controlled?

Abstract

Despite substantial clinical interest in the fracture resistance of human dentin, there is little mechanistic information in archival literature that can be usefully used to model such fracture. In fact, although the fracture event indent in, akin to other mineralized tissues like bone, is widely believed to be locally strain-controlled, there has never been any scientific proof to support this belief. The present study seeks to address this issue through the use of a novel set of in vitro experiments in Hanks' balanced salt solution involving a double-notched bend test geometry, which is designed to discern whether the critical failure events involved in the onset of fracture are locally stress- or strain-controlled. Such experiments are further used to characterize the notion of ''plasticity'' in dentin and the interaction of cracks with the salient microstructural features. It is observed that fracture in dentin is indeed locally strain-controlled and that the presence of dentinal tubules does not substantially affect this process of crack initiation and growth. The results presented are believed to be critical steps in the development of a micromechanical model for the fracture of human dentin that takes into consideration the influence of both the microstructure and the local failuremore » mode.« less

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley NationalLaboratory, Berkeley, CA (US)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Director. Office of Science. Office of Basic EnergySciences; National Institutes of Health. National Institute of Dental andCraniofacial Research Grant P01DE09859
OSTI Identifier:
890621
Report Number(s):
LBNL-51378
R&D Project: 511906; BnR: KC0201020; TRN: US200620%%760
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC02-05CH11231
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Journal of Biomed Materials Research; Journal Volume: 67A; Journal Issue: 67A; Related Information: Journal Publication Date: 2003
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; DENTIN; FRACTURES; GEOMETRY; IN VITRO; MICROSTRUCTURE; PLASTICITY; TUBULES; dentin fracture double notch bend test

Citation Formats

Nalla, R.K., Kinney, J.H., and Ritchie, R.O.. On the fracture of human dentin: Is it stress- orstrain-controlled?. United States: N. p., 2006. Web.
Nalla, R.K., Kinney, J.H., & Ritchie, R.O.. On the fracture of human dentin: Is it stress- orstrain-controlled?. United States.
Nalla, R.K., Kinney, J.H., and Ritchie, R.O.. Wed . "On the fracture of human dentin: Is it stress- orstrain-controlled?". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/890621.
@article{osti_890621,
title = {On the fracture of human dentin: Is it stress- orstrain-controlled?},
author = {Nalla, R.K. and Kinney, J.H. and Ritchie, R.O.},
abstractNote = {Despite substantial clinical interest in the fracture resistance of human dentin, there is little mechanistic information in archival literature that can be usefully used to model such fracture. In fact, although the fracture event indent in, akin to other mineralized tissues like bone, is widely believed to be locally strain-controlled, there has never been any scientific proof to support this belief. The present study seeks to address this issue through the use of a novel set of in vitro experiments in Hanks' balanced salt solution involving a double-notched bend test geometry, which is designed to discern whether the critical failure events involved in the onset of fracture are locally stress- or strain-controlled. Such experiments are further used to characterize the notion of ''plasticity'' in dentin and the interaction of cracks with the salient microstructural features. It is observed that fracture in dentin is indeed locally strain-controlled and that the presence of dentinal tubules does not substantially affect this process of crack initiation and growth. The results presented are believed to be critical steps in the development of a micromechanical model for the fracture of human dentin that takes into consideration the influence of both the microstructure and the local failure mode.},
doi = {},
journal = {Journal of Biomed Materials Research},
number = 67A,
volume = 67A,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Feb 01 00:00:00 EST 2006},
month = {Wed Feb 01 00:00:00 EST 2006}
}
  • Despite substantial clinical interest in the fractureresistance of human dentin, there is little mechanistic information inarchival literature that can be usefully used to model such fracture. Infact, although the fracture event indent in, akin to other mineralizedtissues like bone, is widely believed to be locally strain-controlled,there has never been any scientific proof to support this belief. Thepresent study seeks to address this issue through the use of a novel setof in vitro experiments in Hanks' balanced salt solution involving adouble-notched bend test geometry, which is designed to discern whetherthe critical failure events involved in the onset of fracture are locallystress-more » or strain-controlled. Such experiments are further used tocharacterize the notion of "plasticity" in dentin and the interaction ofcracks with the salient microstructural features. It is observed thatfracture in dentin is indeed locally strain-controlled and that thepresence of dentinal tubules does not substantially affect this processof crack initiation and growth. The results presented are believed to becritical steps in the development ofa micromechanical model for thefracture of human dentin that takes into consideration the influence ofboth the microstructure and the local failure mode.« less
  • The in vitro fracture toughness of human dention has been reported to be of the order of 3 MPa sqrt m. This result, however is based on a single study for a single orientation, and furthermore involves notched, rather than fatigue precracked, test samples.
  • The dentin-enamel junction (DEJ), which is the interface between the dentin and outer enamel coating in teeth, is known for its unique biomechanical properties that provide a crack-arrest barrier for flaws formed in the brittle enamel. In this work, we re-examine how cracks propagate in the proximity of the DEJ, and specifically quantify, using interfacial fracture mechanics, the fracture toughness of the DEJ region. Additionally, we show that the vital function of the DEJ, in preventing cracks formed in enamel from traversing the interface and causing catastrophic tooth fractures, is not necessarily associated with the crack-arrest capabilities of the DEJmore » itself, but rather with the development of crack-tip shielding, primarily from uncracked-ligament bridging, in the mantle dentin adjacent to the DEJ. Measurements of the toughness of the DEJ region give estimates of G{sub c} {approx} 115 J/m{sup 2}, i.e., {approx}5 to 10 times higher than enamel and {approx}75 percent of that of dentin.« less
  • Mineralized tissues, such as bone and tooth dentin, serve as structural materials in the human body and, as such, have evolved to resist fracture. In assessing their quantitative fracture resistance or toughness, it is important to distinguish between intrinsic toughening mechanisms which function ahead of the crack tip, such as plasticity in metals, and extrinsic mechanisms which function primarily behind the tip, such as crack bridging in ceramics. Bone and dentin derive their resistance to fracture principally from extrinsic toughening mechanisms which have their origins in the hierarchical microstructure of these mineralized tissues. Experimentally, quantification of these toughening mechanisms requiresmore » a crack-growth resistance approach, which can be achieved by measuring the crack-driving force, e.g., the stress intensity, as a function of crack extension ("R-curve approach"). Here this methodology is used to study of the effect of aging on the fracture properties of human cortical bone and human dentin in order to discern the microstructural origins of toughness in these materials.« less
  • No abstract prepared.