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Title: GTO-DOE/Industry Cost Shared Research; Microseismic Characterization and Monitoring in Geothermal Systems

Abstract

The application of passive seismic studies in geothermal regions have undergone significant changes in the last 15 years. The primary application is now in the monitoring of subsurface processes, rather than exploration. A joint Geothermal Technology Organization (GTO) industry/DOE, monitoring project involving GEO, Unocal Geothermal, and LBL, was carried out at The Geysers geothermal field in northern California using a special high frequency monitoring system. This several-month-long experiment monitored the discrete and continuous seismic signals before, during, and after a fluid stimulation of a marginal production well. Almost 350,000 liters of water were pumped into the well over a four-hour, and a three-hour time period for two consecutive days in June of 1988. No significant changes in the background seismicity or the seismic noise were detected during the monitoring period. Analysis of the background seismicity did indicate that the earthquakes at The Geysers contain frequencies higher than 50 Hz. and possibly as high as 100 Hz.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Center for Computational Seismology, LBNL (Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), Berkeley, CA)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
890488
Report Number(s):
CONF-890352-9
TRN: US200622%%641
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: DOE Research and Development for the Geothermal Marketplace, Proceedings of the Geothermal Program Review VII; San Francisco, CA, March 21-23, 1989
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
15 GEOTHERMAL ENERGY; EARTHQUAKES; EXPLORATION; GEOTHERMAL FIELDS; GEOTHERMAL SYSTEMS; LAWRENCE BERKELEY LABORATORY; MONITORING; PRODUCTION; SEISMIC NOISE; SEISMICITY; STIMULATION; WATER; Geothermal Legacy

Citation Formats

Majer, E.L.. GTO-DOE/Industry Cost Shared Research; Microseismic Characterization and Monitoring in Geothermal Systems. United States: N. p., 1989. Web.
Majer, E.L.. GTO-DOE/Industry Cost Shared Research; Microseismic Characterization and Monitoring in Geothermal Systems. United States.
Majer, E.L.. Tue . "GTO-DOE/Industry Cost Shared Research; Microseismic Characterization and Monitoring in Geothermal Systems". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/890488.
@article{osti_890488,
title = {GTO-DOE/Industry Cost Shared Research; Microseismic Characterization and Monitoring in Geothermal Systems},
author = {Majer, E.L.},
abstractNote = {The application of passive seismic studies in geothermal regions have undergone significant changes in the last 15 years. The primary application is now in the monitoring of subsurface processes, rather than exploration. A joint Geothermal Technology Organization (GTO) industry/DOE, monitoring project involving GEO, Unocal Geothermal, and LBL, was carried out at The Geysers geothermal field in northern California using a special high frequency monitoring system. This several-month-long experiment monitored the discrete and continuous seismic signals before, during, and after a fluid stimulation of a marginal production well. Almost 350,000 liters of water were pumped into the well over a four-hour, and a three-hour time period for two consecutive days in June of 1988. No significant changes in the background seismicity or the seismic noise were detected during the monitoring period. Analysis of the background seismicity did indicate that the earthquakes at The Geysers contain frequencies higher than 50 Hz. and possibly as high as 100 Hz.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Mar 21 00:00:00 EST 1989},
month = {Tue Mar 21 00:00:00 EST 1989}
}

Conference:
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  • The application of passive seismic studies in geothermal regions have undergone significant changes in the last 15 years. The primary application is now in the monitoring of subsurface processes, rather than exploration. A joint Geothermal Technology Organization (GTO) industry/DOE, monitoring project involving GEO, Unocal Geothermal, and LBL, was carried out at The Geysers geothermal field in northern California using a special high frequency monitoring system. This several-month-long experiment monitored the discrete and continuous seismic signals before, during, and after a fluid stimulation of a marginal production well. Almost 350,000 liters of water were pumped into the well over a four-hour,more » and a three-hour time period for two consecutive days in June of 1988. No significant changes in the background seismicity or the seismic noise were detected during the monitoring period. Analysis of the background seismicity did indicate that the earthquakes at The Geysers contain frequencies higher than 50 Hz and possibly as high as 100 Hz. 5 refs., 5 figs.« less
  • The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has developed a spreadsheet model to provide insight as to how its research activities can impact of cost of producing power from geothermal energy. This model is referred to as GETEM, which stands for “Geothermal Electricity Technologies Evaluation Model”. Based on user input, the model develops estimates of costs associated with exploration, well field development, and power plant construction that are used along with estimated operating costs to provide a predicted power generation cost. The model allows the user to evaluate how reductions in cost, or increases in performance or productivity will impact themore » predicted power generation cost. This feature provides a means of determining how specific technology improvements can impact generation costs, and as such assists DOE in both prioritizing research areas and identifying where research is needed.« less
  • Six hydraulic-fracture injections into a fluvial sandstone at a depth of 4500 ft were monitored with multi-level triaxial seismic receivers in two wells, resulting in maps of the growth and final geometry of each fracture based upon microseismic activity. These diagnostic images show that the hydraulic fractures are highly contained for smaller-volume KCl-water injections, but height growth is significant for the larger-volume, higher-rate, higher-viscosity treatments. Fracture lengths for most injections are similar. Final results are also compared with fracture models.
  • Six hydraulic-fracture injections into a fluvial sandstone at a depth of 4500 ft were monitored with multi-level triaxial seismic receivers in two wells, resulting in maps of the growth and final geometry of each fracture based upon microseismic activity. These diagnostic images show that the hydraulic fractures are highly contained for smaller-volume KCI-water injections, but height growth is significant for the larger-volume, higher-rate, higher-viscosity treatments. Fracture lengths for most injections are similar. Final results are also compared with fracture models.