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Title: SUPPLEMENTAL ON-LINE MATERIAL, INFLUENCE OF pH ON PLUTONIUM DESORPTION/SOLUBILIZATION FROM SEDIMENT

Abstract

The oxidation state distribution of Pu in each sample for each reaction time was measured using a combined ultrafiltration and solvent extraction technique (1-4). First the oxidation state distribution of aqueous Pu is measured. Then the total system (solid and aqueous phase combined) Pu oxidation state distribution is measured by lowering the pH to leach Pu from the solid phase. For each reaction time, a 2.5-mL aliquot of the aqueous phase was removed and passed through a 12-nm filter (Microsep 30K MWCO Centrifugal Device; Pall Corporation, East Hills, NY). An aliquot of the filtrate was removed to determine the aqueous phase Pu concentration, and oxidation state distribution in the remaining filtrate was measured using the parallel solvent extraction technique discussed.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
SRS
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
890058
Report Number(s):
WSRC-MS-2006-00144
TRN: US0604611
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC09-96SR1850
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
38 RADIATION CHEMISTRY, RADIOCHEMISTRY, AND NUCLEAR CHEMISTRY; PLUTONIUM; SEDIMENTS; SOLVENT EXTRACTION; ULTRAFILTRATION; VALENCE; PH VALUE; DESORPTION; DISSOLUTION; CONCENTRATION RATIO

Citation Formats

Kaplan, D. SUPPLEMENTAL ON-LINE MATERIAL, INFLUENCE OF pH ON PLUTONIUM DESORPTION/SOLUBILIZATION FROM SEDIMENT. United States: N. p., 2006. Web.
Kaplan, D. SUPPLEMENTAL ON-LINE MATERIAL, INFLUENCE OF pH ON PLUTONIUM DESORPTION/SOLUBILIZATION FROM SEDIMENT. United States.
Kaplan, D. Wed . "SUPPLEMENTAL ON-LINE MATERIAL, INFLUENCE OF pH ON PLUTONIUM DESORPTION/SOLUBILIZATION FROM SEDIMENT". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/890058.
@article{osti_890058,
title = {SUPPLEMENTAL ON-LINE MATERIAL, INFLUENCE OF pH ON PLUTONIUM DESORPTION/SOLUBILIZATION FROM SEDIMENT},
author = {Kaplan, D},
abstractNote = {The oxidation state distribution of Pu in each sample for each reaction time was measured using a combined ultrafiltration and solvent extraction technique (1-4). First the oxidation state distribution of aqueous Pu is measured. Then the total system (solid and aqueous phase combined) Pu oxidation state distribution is measured by lowering the pH to leach Pu from the solid phase. For each reaction time, a 2.5-mL aliquot of the aqueous phase was removed and passed through a 12-nm filter (Microsep 30K MWCO Centrifugal Device; Pall Corporation, East Hills, NY). An aliquot of the filtrate was removed to determine the aqueous phase Pu concentration, and oxidation state distribution in the remaining filtrate was measured using the parallel solvent extraction technique discussed.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Mar 08 00:00:00 EST 2006},
month = {Wed Mar 08 00:00:00 EST 2006}
}
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